kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Disappearing Earth

Availability: Ready to download

For fans of Anthony Marra's A Constellation of Vital Phenomena and Téa Obreht's The Tiger's Wife: the kidnapping of two small girls on a remote peninsula in Russia sets in motion an evocative, moving, searingly original debut novel by a dazzling young writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern tip of Russia, two girls – sisters, ages e For fans of Anthony Marra's A Constellation of Vital Phenomena and Téa Obreht's The Tiger's Wife: the kidnapping of two small girls on a remote peninsula in Russia sets in motion an evocative, moving, searingly original debut novel by a dazzling young writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern tip of Russia, two girls – sisters, ages eight and eleven – go missing. The police investigation that follows turns up nothing. In the girls' tightly-woven community, everyone must grapple with the loss. But the fear and danger of their disappearance is felt most profoundly among the women of this isolated place. Taking us one chapter per month across a year on Kamchatka, this powerful novel connects the lives of characters changed by the sisters' abduction: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. Theirs is an ethnically diverse population in which racial tensions simmer, and so-called "natives" are often suspected of the worst. As the story radiates from the peninsula's capital city to its rural north, we are brought to places of astonishing beauty: densely wooded forests, open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, and glassy seas. Disappearing Earth is a multifaceted story of the intimate lives of women – their vulnerabilities and perils, their desires and dreams. It speaks to the complex yet enduring bonds of community as it offers startlingly vivid portraits of people reaching out to one another and, sometimes, reaching back to save each other. ​Spellbinding, moving – evoking a fascinating region on the other side of the world – this suspenseful and haunting story announces the debut of a profoundly gifted writer.


Compare
kode adsense disini

For fans of Anthony Marra's A Constellation of Vital Phenomena and Téa Obreht's The Tiger's Wife: the kidnapping of two small girls on a remote peninsula in Russia sets in motion an evocative, moving, searingly original debut novel by a dazzling young writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern tip of Russia, two girls – sisters, ages e For fans of Anthony Marra's A Constellation of Vital Phenomena and Téa Obreht's The Tiger's Wife: the kidnapping of two small girls on a remote peninsula in Russia sets in motion an evocative, moving, searingly original debut novel by a dazzling young writer. One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern tip of Russia, two girls – sisters, ages eight and eleven – go missing. The police investigation that follows turns up nothing. In the girls' tightly-woven community, everyone must grapple with the loss. But the fear and danger of their disappearance is felt most profoundly among the women of this isolated place. Taking us one chapter per month across a year on Kamchatka, this powerful novel connects the lives of characters changed by the sisters' abduction: a witness, a neighbor, a detective, a mother. Theirs is an ethnically diverse population in which racial tensions simmer, and so-called "natives" are often suspected of the worst. As the story radiates from the peninsula's capital city to its rural north, we are brought to places of astonishing beauty: densely wooded forests, open expanses of tundra, soaring volcanoes, and glassy seas. Disappearing Earth is a multifaceted story of the intimate lives of women – their vulnerabilities and perils, their desires and dreams. It speaks to the complex yet enduring bonds of community as it offers startlingly vivid portraits of people reaching out to one another and, sometimes, reaching back to save each other. ​Spellbinding, moving – evoking a fascinating region on the other side of the world – this suspenseful and haunting story announces the debut of a profoundly gifted writer.

30 review for Disappearing Earth

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    What answers could Alla Innokentevna have for her? Marina might ask what it was like to see your child turn thirteen, or fifteen, or graduate from high school. How it felt to know, and not just suspect, that if you had been a better parent, more attentive, more responsible, then your baby would not be gone today. How to go on. Disappearing Earth is quite an extraordinary novel. There is a missing persons mystery at the centre of the book, but no one should go into this expecting a typical mystery. Or a typic What answers could Alla Innokentevna have for her? Marina might ask what it was like to see your child turn thirteen, or fifteen, or graduate from high school. How it felt to know, and not just suspect, that if you had been a better parent, more attentive, more responsible, then your baby would not be gone today. How to go on. Disappearing Earth is quite an extraordinary novel. There is a missing persons mystery at the centre of the book, but no one should go into this expecting a typical mystery. Or a typical anything at all. I love it when an author tries something different and it just works. Here, Phillips begins on the remote Kamchatka peninsula, in the city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, with two young girls accepting a ride home from a stranger and then going missing. The need to discover the girls' fate offers an immediate emotional pull, but their disappearance hovers mostly in the background for the many different stories that follow it. And Disappearing Earth contains just that-- many stories. It can be read almost like a short story collection, with all stories alluding to or being affected by the missing girls. Phillips introduces us to many different characters, each one completely distinct, complex and sympathetic. Natasha sent him back a selfie with her middle finger raised. Then she followed that almost instantly with a picture of herself lit by the lamp on their bedside table, her top lowered, her lips and cheeks spun by the low wattage into dark gold. The story of their marriage: a little love, a little rage, a lot of ocean water. The author looks at small town fears and suspicions. The unusual and effective choice to tell each chapter from a different point of view allows for a bigger picture of this place to develop, as well as an intimate portrait of all the characters. It reminds me of Winesburg, Ohio in its scope and beauty, and a bit of Orange's There There in its interlinking but separate stories. It was also beautifully atmospheric to me. I love books with a strong sense of place, and I feel like this can create a mood which permeates the entire novel. I should add that here this is probably at least in part due to my complete ignorance of this area of the world, both its geography and its customs. So to me it was a very new experience. I am curious what Russian readers will think. Through so many different perspectives, we see how the disappearance of the girls affects everyone, and how this changes over time. The initial panic and fear of outsiders, the comparison to other disappearances, and the gradual fading from memory. I also found it very interesting how the author managed to comment on so many different issues - post-Soviet society, racism against natives, and homophobia, for example - without it becoming a book about said issues. The exploration of all these things rises organically out of the characters living their lives, and is never heavy-handed, preachy or judgemental. It's a beautiful smart read for fans of "literary thrillers" and a thoughtful meditation on culture, race, sexuality, and small town politics in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union. Between this and Miracle Creek, I am really falling in love with these complex character dramas with a mystery/thriller backdrop. I always used to say my favourite thrillers were those that focused on the characters and were rewarding even if you figured out the reveal. Well, I guess I found the perfect kind of book for me. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    The correct response to the ending of this book is a violently whispered, “fuck.” Reading the last couple chapters, it felt like my heart sprang into my throat and seemed to hang there, hammering. Five thousand sentences sprinted through my mind and none of them got to the finish tape. It was as though the blanket of shock that had muted the events of this book was suddenly thrown off, and flooding my senses, was a seethe of feelings: dread, fear, hope, relief, each entangled in the roots of th“.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    karen

    oooh, goodreads choice awards semifinalist for BEST MYSTERY/THRILLER 2019! what will happen? this is one of those rare perfect books. the fact that it’s a debut only makes it more impressive, and no matter what this author writes next, i will be on it immediately. i was fortunate enough to stumble upon a free arc of this, thinking-to-self, ‘this looks like it could be good,’ and then when i saw all the high praise it was receiving in its early reviews, i decided to bump it up the old arc-stack and see what oooh, goodreads choice awards semifinalist for BEST MYSTERY/THRILLER 2019! what will happen? this is one of those rare perfect books. the fact that it’s a debut only makes it more impressive, and no matter what this author writes next, i will be on it immediately. i was fortunate enough to stumble upon a free arc of this, thinking-to-self, ‘this looks like it could be good,’ and then when i saw all the high praise it was receiving in its early reviews, i decided to bump it up the old arc-stack and see what all the fuss was about. lemme tell you, the fuss is earned. it takes place on russia’s kamchatka peninsula, and at its center is the disappearance of two little girls; sisters eight and eleven, who get into a stranger’s car and… vanish. each chapter that follows carries the story forward a month - from the girls’ abduction in august to the following july, and each is told from a different character’s perspective. the disappearance worms its way into every chapter, but is usually only used to season the stories - how the situation affected different people who live in the area, most of whom had no direct connection with the girls themselves, and each chapter is gripping and fully-realized enough to stand alone as a short story.  it’s such an original way to tell a missing-kids narrative; using that same structure i love in Winesburg, Ohio - a smalltown short story cycle that both is and isn’t a novel, but this one has more specific touchpoints, and as time passes, the impact of the tragedy shifts the way any sensational news story shifts with the passing of time and proximity, slipping into cautionary tale or local legend, dredging up memories of earlier disappearances, giving way to ’where were you when…’ recollections, becoming a different kind of collective reference point. most multiple POV books will pick a handful of characters and alternate between them, and it was a great moment of realization for me, about three chapters in, when i clocked to the, “oh, so we’re just not going to go back to that character’s POV at all, wow.” at first, i was a little disappointed, because i had become invested in particular voices, but with each chapter, i found myself making a whole new investment, and once i started approaching this more as a short story cycle, i appreciated it even more, because that’s just so freaking hard to pull off, and she does it remarkably well. characters do pop up again, but seen through someone else’s eyes, and these transitions and the recurring motifs are handled beautifully. i admit to being a very ignorant person when it comes to culture and geography, and this book introduced me to a region i knew absolutely nothing about; phillips’ descriptions of the landscape, ethnic makeup, history, and social fabric of kamchatka was illuminating and engrossing and - without a drop of hyperbole on my part - masterful. i loved this book so very much. her writing is flawless, the build is rich and textured, the ending is satisfying. my only (oh-so-minor) complaint is i wish she hadn’t dropped that mic in the final paragraph, because we knew without it being pointed out and i think it would have been more elegant to not call attention to it so explicitly. but i mean, really - that’s not even a couple’s spat in the love i have for this book. it is not to be missed. *************************** stunned. a brilliant, brilliant debut. review to come. come to my blog!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    "One hand came up to press on her sternum. Her heart hurt. If Marina could peel off her left breast, crack back her ribs, and grip that muscular organ to settle it, she would. She started having these attacks last August, after her daughters had disappeared. A doctor gave her tablets to relieve the anxiety. Those did not help. No prescription brought her children home." Wow. It's been a hot minute since a debut novel created such a deep well of emotion in me, so much so that I am shocked that "One hand came up to press on her sternum. Her heart hurt. If Marina could peel off her left breast, crack back her ribs, and grip that muscular organ to settle it, she would. She started having these attacks last August, after her daughters had disappeared. A doctor gave her tablets to relieve the anxiety. Those did not help. No prescription brought her children home." Wow. It's been a hot minute since a debut novel created such a deep well of emotion in me, so much so that I am shocked that Disappearing Earth is not written by a seasoned author. It seems to me that a quiet buzz has grown around this book; I hadn't heard of it before, but all at once I saw glowing review after glowing review roll in, while also finding it placed prominently in our local Barnes and Noble. After seeing it newly placed on the shelf at the library, I decided to grab it before someone else did and jump on the hype train to see what all the fuss was about. I'm thrilled that I did, because I've been in somewhat of a reading funk, and this was exactly the type of story I needed to focus my mind where I want it to be. If you read the synopsis, it informs you that this is a story involving the disappearance of two young girls in a remote part of Russia, but the real gold here is the ripple effect of how this event disturbs the lives of a large cast of characters. (Don't worry, there's a handy list at the beginning of the book that I referred to with each passing chapter, and only adds to the charm of this form of storytelling.) If you're looking for a fast paced thriller or a police procedural focusing on the kidnapping, that's not what this story is, but it offers something far more valuable and insightful. We do get some answers by the end of the book, but the beauty of this tale is that the disappearance is simultaneously at the forefront and background, as it is the driving factor of the choices that these townspeople make over the following calendar year, but it also doesn't take flashy center stage as to allow the reader to connect with each narrator along the way. One of the strongest aspects of this book is its ability to create a strong sense of place, to the point that the setting and atmospheric descriptions are just as much characters of the story as the people we hear from. Disappearing Earth is a slow-burning character study, but it never felt dull or boring. I found it best to read a few sections per evening, take some time to ponder, and either alternate with another book or simply wait to pick this back up the following day. If you're looking for a unique read, one that is reminiscent of literary fiction without pretense or snobbery, look no further. Highly recommended, and I simply cannot wait to see what the author decides to regale us with next!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beata

    The premise of Disappearing Earth was the immediate reason behind choosing this novel. The Kamchatka Peninsula is I guess 10 time zones away from where I live, and has always been mysterious and unreachable to me. The landscape and its diversity regarding the population are the main themes of the novel. The abduction of two girls is only the pretext for portraying modern inhabitants, their dreams and failures. The first chapter tells the story of the kidnapping but if you want to read a thriller The premise of Disappearing Earth was the immediate reason behind choosing this novel. The Kamchatka Peninsula is I guess 10 time zones away from where I live, and has always been mysterious and unreachable to me. The landscape and its diversity regarding the population are the main themes of the novel. The abduction of two girls is only the pretext for portraying modern inhabitants, their dreams and failures. The first chapter tells the story of the kidnapping but if you want to read a thriller in which you might seek thorough investigation done by a team of clever police officers, you will be disappointed. BUT you will not be disappointed if you want to learn about the lives of ordinary people living in that remote region. Each chapter tells a story of a different female character who is loosely connected with the two abducted girls, and I was especially touched by two of them, one being that of the girls’ mother, and the other of a woman who loses her four-legged friend with whom she has a special bond. It is interesting that men in this novel appear only in the background and are not given a chance to reflect on their inner lives. Coincidence? I do not think so. The beauty of the landscape and the way the indigenous population relates to it are exceptionally vividly presented. And one more thing. Chapter One, the actual abduction, is one of the best I have read recently … it did give me the shivers … A splendid debut from Ms Phillips!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Kamchatka. My only knowledge of Kamchatka was that it is the name of cheap vodka my friends and I drank during our salad days. We re-named it “coming atcha” when we became employed and could afford premium vodka. Actually, the Kamchatka peninsula is located in the far east of Russia and is isolated by water and mountains. Kamchatka is a land of extremes from tundra to volcanoes to verdant forests and the descriptions of the peninsula are jaw dropping. I'm not sure of the reason but I was startle Kamchatka. My only knowledge of Kamchatka was that it is the name of cheap vodka my friends and I drank during our salad days. We re-named it “coming atcha” when we became employed and could afford premium vodka. Actually, the Kamchatka peninsula is located in the far east of Russia and is isolated by water and mountains. Kamchatka is a land of extremes from tundra to volcanoes to verdant forests and the descriptions of the peninsula are jaw dropping. I'm not sure of the reason but I was startled that the indigenous people, the Evens, are treated with disdain by Caucasian Russians. More than likely this is the result of yet another knowledge gap. Anyway, it is in Kamchatka that two little girls go missing. Despite the premise, this is not a thriller. It reads almost like a series of interconnected short stories, that is, almost but not quite. The disappearance of these girls has a ripple effect throughout the community over the course of a year. Six degrees of separation, indeed. This is a staggering work of originality, insight and depth.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Two sisters ages eight and eleven go missing on the Kamchatka peninsula. Boy did I want to yell at my book "No, no, no, no, no!" during the first story. UGH! The police are quickly called to investigate but find nothing - no clues, no evidence, etc. They are missing without a trace. This book spans the course of a year with each chapter being another month after the girls go missing. Each chapter is also about a new character. The characters have had their lives changed in some way du Two sisters ages eight and eleven go missing on the Kamchatka peninsula. Boy did I want to yell at my book "No, no, no, no, no!" during the first story. UGH! The police are quickly called to investigate but find nothing - no clues, no evidence, etc. They are missing without a trace. This book spans the course of a year with each chapter being another month after the girls go missing. Each chapter is also about a new character. The characters have had their lives changed in some way due to the girl’s disappearance. Some being a witness, a detective, a customs officer, a student, a woman whose sister went missing, etc. The final chapter is the girl's mother. As the book suggests this book shows the lives of women (and those in their lives) who have been touched in some way due to the girl’s disappearance. I found this to be a fast read. Due in part mainly to the fact that the chapters read like short stories and it was easy to go through them. While reading about the lives of those in the community, I had a nagging thought...what happened to those girls? I really enjoyed how the stories were connected even if only by a small thread. The connections are there. Plus, the writing was beautiful. Hats off to the Author for her unique and enjoyable story telling. I found myself enjoying each story/chapter a little bit more than the last. Plus, the ending! That is all that I will say. Very enjoyable book which was very original and captivating. I have been getting annoyed lately with books that remind me of other books. Reading this was like a breath of fresh air. This could have been a mystery about two missing girls, but it became so much more. Everything comes together in a very seamless manner. Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    DnF at 40% Wanted to like this but I'm just not connecting with the story. Two you g girls go missing. Each succeeding chapter covers a month since they are gone. Each chapter also introduces new characters, whose life has been marginally impacted by this tragedy. The problem is not only that I was bored, which I was, but that I wasn't taken by any of these characters, just didn't care about them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elyse (retired from reviewing/semi hiatus) Walters

    “This could never have taken place in Soviet times, Valentina Nikolaevna said”. “You girls can’t imagine how safe it use to be. No foreigners. No outsiders. Opening the peninsula was the biggest mistake our authorities ever made”. “Now we’re overrun with tourists, migraines. Natives. These criminals”. “Olya should have kept her tongue behind her teeth. But she asked, ‘Weren’t the natives always here”. “They use to stay in the villages where they belong”. Ouch! Two sisters were last seen -ki “This could never have taken place in Soviet times, Valentina Nikolaevna said”. “You girls can’t imagine how safe it use to be. No foreigners. No outsiders. Opening the peninsula was the biggest mistake our authorities ever made”. “Now we’re overrun with tourists, migraines. Natives. These criminals”. “Olya should have kept her tongue behind her teeth. But she asked, ‘Weren’t the natives always here”. “They use to stay in the villages where they belong”. Ouch! Two sisters were last seen -kidnapped- in Petropavlovski’s center - ( Kamchatka peninsula in the Far East area of Russia), which meant nothing in the city of 200,000 people and a peninsula 1200 km long. Mothers like Valentina Nikolaevna, were panicked- fearful - afraid - for their own children. She no longer wanted her daughter, Diana to play with her best friend, Olya, any longer. Valentina Nikolaevna felt Olga’s family was a bad influence. She was uncomfortable with their lack of structure and discipline. Valentina was harsh and ruthless about Olya seeing her daughter outside of school. The 13 year old girls, best friends, were only allowed to see each other under supervision in class. The tragedy of the missing sisters- Sophia & Alyona Golosovskaya, ages 8 and 11...brought stricter curfews, and many posters of the missing girls... and a paranoid community. The comparing, judging, and evaluating each other‘s families sabotaged friendships. Olya knew Diana’s mother, Valentina Nikolaevna hated her....for no reason..... “because they were brave enough to survive on their own”. This novel interconnects many different stories with the large cast of characters. There’s a full list of the characters, with their Russian names, at the beginning of the novel. I didn’t find it too difficult but I did flip to the beginning a few times to check with character belonged to which family. What made it easy to keep my place... was that each chapter is titled with ‘the month’ of the year. So when flipping back and forth - I just had to remember which month I was reading. It begins in August- and ends the next year in July. I also listened to the Audiobook- but I wouldn’t recommend it alone. I found this was a book I needed to read myself.... and not because the narrator for the audiobook wasn’t good it was just harder for me to experience the book. There are some beautiful written sentences of Kamchatka region... while we wonder how the two missing sisters are. Are they alive? I never stopped wondering. “In the sunset, the pebbles on the shore shifted their color from black and gray to honey. Amber. They were brightening. Soon the stones would glow, and the water in the day was going to turn pink and orange. Spectacular in the City center, where people feared to have their pretty daughters go”. August, September, October,.... and so on ‘till July...we meet so many characters - while the author explores social economic conditions - crime- community’s bitterness - and the fall of the Soviet Union. The storytelling is excellent ... yet I’m not sure this is a book I’d highly recommend. Given all the different Russian names - and a few slow parts - I’m not ‘sure’ this book will have lasting power for me. At the same time - my eyes have been opened to the Kamchatka peninsula region, and some of its history. For a debut- the author -Julia Phillips should definitely be applauded & personally satisfied. I’d happily read her next book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yun

    I had high hopes going into Disappearing Earth as I had heard so many great things about it. But it pretty much disappointed me from beginning to end. I think this is a case of mismatched expectations and experiences. Everything that others loved about this book are all the same reasons I don't. The premise of this book is interesting enough: two young girls disappear from a Russian town, which sends the the townspeople reeling over the next few months as the investigation turns up nothing I had high hopes going into Disappearing Earth as I had heard so many great things about it. But it pretty much disappointed me from beginning to end. I think this is a case of mismatched expectations and experiences. Everything that others loved about this book are all the same reasons I don't. The premise of this book is interesting enough: two young girls disappear from a Russian town, which sends the the townspeople reeling over the next few months as the investigation turns up nothing. Except what I got isn't what I expected. First, there was no real crime investigation depicted in this book. It was mostly a bunch of hearsay on the part of gossipy townspeople and inaction/incompetence on the part of the police. So to go into this book thinking it is a crime drama of any sort would be mistaken. Also, this town isn't small, so why would people be obsessed with the disappearance of two girls for months? The writing is stilted and awkward. There are sentences where the meaning is unclear, so I have to read it multiple times to understand. There are ambiguous pronouns in multiple places. There are odd dialogues where it sounds like someone is making a joke, but it's not clear why it's funny or who said what. All this made the book hard to read. The theme of this book doesn't tie together either. This is written so that each chapter is a month from the perspective of a different woman in town. Unfortunately, with one exception, their stories don't have anything to do with each other, so you are essentially reading standalone stories that all just happen to take place in the same town. Also, none of the characters are likable or memorable. Most of them are narrow-minded, prejudiced, and quick to judge others. When faced with choices, they inevitability make the wrong ones and end up with the wrong men. But instead of learning from their mistakes, they choose to suffer, as if suffering itself was a noble cause. Then, once having chosen that, they look down their noses at others trying have a little joy in their life. It's an odd culture that permeates this town and this book. I almost abandoned this book many times, but I thought it would get better if I toughed on. The only parts of the book I found interesting are the ones related to the crime itself, which are just the beginning and the end. The rest was a meandering journey through unlikable characters making the worst of circumstances and feeling bad for themselves. I'm sorry to say that this isn't for me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Agnieszka

    3,5/5 Disappearing Earth in many respects, at least on the surface, reminded me Jon McGregor's Reservoir 13. Both novels start almost the same way, only in Julia Phillips' book two girls, sisters Alyona and Sofia, went missing. And at both titles initial situation is merely a ground for subsequent events. Both authors focused not on the mysterious disappearing, though we never lose it from sight, but took this as an opportunity to weave stories of place and people. In my estimation McGregor is more detaile/>Disappearing 3,5/5 Disappearing Earth in many respects, at least on the surface, reminded me Jon McGregor's Reservoir 13. Both novels start almost the same way, only in Julia Phillips' book two girls, sisters Alyona and Sofia, went missing. And at both titles initial situation is merely a ground for subsequent events. Both authors focused not on the mysterious disappearing, though we never lose it from sight, but took this as an opportunity to weave stories of place and people. In my estimation McGregor is more detailed and pays a lot more attention to changing seasons, weather, descriptions of nature world, clouds and colours of the sky and even the tiniest symptom of every day life. In his novel we witness several years after the girl's, her name is Becky, missing. Julie Phillips in her novel took only one year to introduce her protagonists and events, primarily from woman's point of view. You could read the novel as a collection of short stories as well. One month and one tale. Of lost illusions, unrealized chances, disappointment. Disappearing earth. Vanishing girls. Dying tradition. Broken ties. Past history. The author managed jam in her novel quite a number of issues: racist attacs on economic immigrants, homophobic actions especially visible in smaller cities, disregard for ethnic minorities, she does give us a lot details on tribes living on the far north, their culture and life that goes unchangingly for years, but her main focus is on a small group of people, maybe not directly connected to missing girls, apart from their mother obviously, but in a way participating in searchings. The woman who allegedly saw a potential abductor, policeman conducting an investigation, school teacher, member of rescue team, mother of the other girl that vanished some years back to mention only few of them. Each family has own painful story that beggs to be told and all of them create mosaic of different fates. Youngsters feel attracted to big cities, the old seem to still mourn for bygone times under USSR leadership while autochtons are less at home than Russian citizens what one may see in approach to the investigation. The novel seems pretty much embedded in post Soviet reality, reality when the Soviet union collapsed and what emerged afterwards not entirely met expectations of many its inhabitants. Bleakness and overwhelming sense of failure, lack of security or loss of integrity and unity are the feelings protagonists of Disappearing Earth experience on daily basis. It's set on the Kamchatka Peninsula, I enjoyed description of Petropavlovsk, the main city of the region, miserable and prospectless, though if not evocation of tundra, volcanos and geysers further on the north it could be almost every other city lost in economical and structural transformation. Don’t get me wrong, I do think Julia Phillips quite well handled it, as an outsider of course, but can’t get rid of an impression she’d rather stick to not that exotic for herself scenery. I’m rather of the opinion that it’s not enough to cast protagonists on alien background to evoke spirit of the place and living in there people.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    The reason I added this book to my TBR list is because I love the cover. After cataloging it for my library, I left it sitting on my desk for a couple of hours just to admire the cover when my eyes needed a break from the computer. The colours are exquisite! I had to read the book, just because I fell in love with the cover. Thankfully I didn't waste my time on a book I hated. It paid to judge this book by its cover! Set on a remote peninsula in Russia, the book opens with a chapter o The reason I added this book to my TBR list is because I love the cover. After cataloging it for my library, I left it sitting on my desk for a couple of hours just to admire the cover when my eyes needed a break from the computer. The colours are exquisite! I had to read the book, just because I fell in love with the cover. Thankfully I didn't waste my time on a book I hated. It paid to judge this book by its cover! Set on a remote peninsula in Russia, the book opens with a chapter on two young girls, sisters. They are spending the day at the lake when a strange man injures his ankle and asks for their assistance getting back to his car. Yeh, you guessed it..... he abducts them. Disappearing Earth isn't your usual detective/mystery book. Instead of focusing on the police investigation, each chapter is concerns a different person, in consecutive months following the abduction. It details each woman's specific life, what is going on in it and how the abduction touches upon her life personally. The book is gorgeously written, with believable and well-developed characters. Normally I don't like books that have several POVs but it works for this novel. It works very well. Instead of finding myself disoriented with so many main characters, I felt like I got to know each of these women personally. I came to care about each one. I did get annoyed a few times when the book focused on some of their relationships with men. UGH! I get tired of reading about straight relationships -- no offense to straight people, it just gets to be a bit much when most novels are mainly about straight people, and I can't relate to woman-man relationships. For that reason alone, with my interest waning during those parts, I'm giving this 4 stars instead of 5 and want to point this out because it's not a problem most people will have with this book. It is extremely well-written and grabbed my attention in the very first chapter - on the very first page! - immersing me in its world. And of course -- that cover!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Disappearing Earth transported me to a world that I barely knew existed, the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. The setting, like the painting on the cover, is vivid and memorable. The book is a series of snapshots of women loosely linked by geography, one for each month of the year after the disappearance of two young girls. I loved learning about life in Petropavlovsk and the Peninsula and flipped back and forth to the map constantly. The blurb on my book calls it propulsive and suspenseful which is qu Disappearing Earth transported me to a world that I barely knew existed, the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. The setting, like the painting on the cover, is vivid and memorable. The book is a series of snapshots of women loosely linked by geography, one for each month of the year after the disappearance of two young girls. I loved learning about life in Petropavlovsk and the Peninsula and flipped back and forth to the map constantly. The blurb on my book calls it propulsive and suspenseful which is quite misleading. This is a slow moving book and feels much longer than 255 pages. It is not a thriller or a page turner. No matter - this wonderful book reminds me why I read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I do wish people would read contemporary Russian literature instead of this Russia fanfic which doesn’t evoke Russia in any way. May I suggest Ludmila Petrushevskaya for example? Imagine if I tried to write a book about American soul after leaving in the USA for 2 years? P.S. Herring again? Goodness, why?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    "Disappearing Earth" is an exquisitely beautiful and deeply haunting novel: a tale of two girls' abduction that is actually less about them or even the search for them than it is about the world from which they have vanished. And what a world it is: the Kamchatka peninsula in post-Soviet Russia. Julia Phillips is a terrific writer, with sentences that are lean and precise, and a soul that seems rich with empathy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holly B

    Putting to the side for now. Huge cast of characters in each new chapter. I'm having a time focusing and getting easily distracted. May just be the timing for me. Just not wanting to pick it up, so will give it a pause.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donna Backshall

    What an odd feeling, to have such a subdued book impact me in such a powerful way. There's still so much I don't understand, yet I feel like I just lived an emotionally exhausting week among the struggling yet strong Russian women of this novel. Perhaps I'm so overwhelmed because the main character of Disappearing Earth was not a person, but rather an entire place and culture. Kamchatka is a remote peninsula in the Russian Far East, about the size of California and not far from Alaska. I suggest in/>Perhaps What an odd feeling, to have such a subdued book impact me in such a powerful way. There's still so much I don't understand, yet I feel like I just lived an emotionally exhausting week among the struggling yet strong Russian women of this novel. Perhaps I'm so overwhelmed because the main character of Disappearing Earth was not a person, but rather an entire place and culture. Kamchatka is a remote peninsula in the Russian Far East, about the size of California and not far from Alaska. I suggest investigating the history of this rugged area and its native peoples when picking up this novel. A little understanding up front might help you appreciate how the disappearance of a couple young girls could so fully impact an entire tundra region. As well, the construction of this book is unique and difficult to embrace if you're not expecting it. It offers a month-by-month view into the lives of different woman who live in Kamchatka. You are not supposed to find any connection between these women beyond where they live (not until the very end of the book, anyway). We see how each one survives everyday life, facing the savage weather, the bravado of the men, the racism against indigenous peoples by the mainland Russians who emigrated there, and the all-too-common financial struggles. It's a fascinating succession of short stories exposing the culture of this remote community, tied together by one event that rippled through and affected each of them in powerful ways. I admit I don't know enough about the (pre-collapse) Soviet Union, but all the references to "before" that were made have me aching to find out more about the then and now of Russian culture. That's the kind of book I love most: one that makes me wonder and question, and inspires me to learn more.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    High concept, low return on reading investment. I was eagerly anticipating this novel, placed it on our book club's roster, but what I found was a series of short stories very loosely connected to the disappearance of two little girls. I didn’t go into this believing it would be a thriller, on the contrary, I was hoping for something akin to Strout’s Anything is Possible where the interconnected stories built a complete picture. What I found instead were vignettes of lives orbiting the main event. I High concept, low return on reading investment. I was eagerly anticipating this novel, placed it on our book club's roster, but what I found was a series of short stories very loosely connected to the disappearance of two little girls. I didn’t go into this believing it would be a thriller, on the contrary, I was hoping for something akin to Strout’s Anything is Possible where the interconnected stories built a complete picture. What I found instead were vignettes of lives orbiting the main event. I can appreciate the structure and even the large cast of characters which seems a nod to Russian writers, especially Tolstoy (just try to keep the many characters in War and Peace straight), but construct is all I found and never quite felt connected. Maybe it was the surfeit of issues addressed, the year’s worth of plot points or the topographic descriptions to create atmosphere, but for me it was all too much and also not enough to immerse myself in the narrative. I am clearly in the minority here except for those that started and abandoned, but cold and lonely as it may be on this outlier peninsula, I just can’t see my way to giving this more than two stars for lack of enjoyment.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan Collins

    In a single word, this book was extraordinary. I’ve never read a novel with this structure before; the chapters read like beautiful short stories, each with their own climaxes, each with their own casts of characters. But threaded between them all is the ongoing case of two missing sisters, and we see how these characters’ lives are impacted by or resonate with the girls’ disappearance. I was also blown away by the ending, which will maybe go down as one of my favorite endings of all time. It wa In a single word, this book was extraordinary. I’ve never read a novel with this structure before; the chapters read like beautiful short stories, each with their own climaxes, each with their own casts of characters. But threaded between them all is the ongoing case of two missing sisters, and we see how these characters’ lives are impacted by or resonate with the girls’ disappearance. I was also blown away by the ending, which will maybe go down as one of my favorite endings of all time. It was such a perfect cap to an emotional, riveting book. On top of all that, the writing is gorgeous, and it’s a book you can feel deep within your gut, one that will stay with you long after you’re done.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erin Glover

    Similar to how everyone is related in the movie Crash, all the characters are related in this mystery about the disappearance of two little girls across the world in a remote region of Russia. Phillips introduces us to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, “the last bit of land before sea.” The district is part of the Kamchatka Peninsula, bordered by ocean on three sides and a vast impassable tundra to the north. A witness purports to see Alyona, 11, and her eight-year-old sister Sophia with a man near a cl Similar to how everyone is related in the movie Crash, all the characters are related in this mystery about the disappearance of two little girls across the world in a remote region of Russia. Phillips introduces us to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, “the last bit of land before sea.” The district is part of the Kamchatka Peninsula, bordered by ocean on three sides and a vast impassable tundra to the north. A witness purports to see Alyona, 11, and her eight-year-old sister Sophia with a man near a clean black SUV in town. The witness proves unreliable. So what happened to the girls who were wandering the shoreline? The characters are nuanced and diverse. Some are Russian, some are from ethnic minorities whose families are reindeer herders, and some are migrants. Their lives touch as they respond to the news of the missing girls. The plotting is suspenseful, especially toward the end, but it’s the characters that move this story forward. Phillips captures despair with profound empathy. But she leaves room for a little hope in the individuals’ lives, hope they need to survive harsh Russian life. There are many themes that will ring true universally, even though the setting is so different from our western world-view. For instance, the deep depression resulting from the loss of a child; the frustration with dealing with government bureaucracies; the fear of migrants and how they could change the status quo; the hopelessness of cancer; and the terror felt upon learning a pedophile could be in your midst. These feelings are just as true in remote Russia as they are in the western world. Update on July 25, 2019: This is a novel where reading it with the benefit of Kindle X-ray is incredibly helpful. There is an ever-changing cast of characters that is exceedingly difficult to keep track of. Whenever I got confused, I simply clicked on the character's name and could see all the places that person was mentioned and how they fit in the story. I've noticed a number of reviews that complain about the number of characters but it wasn't a problem for me because I didn't read the hard copy. Also, I can't imagine how someone could enjoy the audio version of this novel due to the sheer volume of characters. Yet, every single one is important.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Unfortunately, this book did not live up to my high expectations. Based on many favorable reviews, I was expecting a memorable reading experience, when in fact it has failed to move me and I could not connect with any of the characters. My biggest issue was the 30+ cast of characters. This type of books annoy me in general - I had a similar issue with Paula Hawkins's "Into the water" and Khaled Hosseini's "An the mountains echoed". But in this specific book, it was not enough to have that many c Unfortunately, this book did not live up to my high expectations. Based on many favorable reviews, I was expecting a memorable reading experience, when in fact it has failed to move me and I could not connect with any of the characters. My biggest issue was the 30+ cast of characters. This type of books annoy me in general - I had a similar issue with Paula Hawkins's "Into the water" and Khaled Hosseini's "An the mountains echoed". But in this specific book, it was not enough to have that many characters, but now on top of that, most of the characters and their stories were completely random and you only heard about them for 1 chapter and never heard of them again! That was very frustrating for me. Why come up with so many different characters only to never use this information again?? I was puzzled and to be honest - really bored and dragging my feet through this book. Perhaps, the writer wanted to give us a glimpse of all the different families that live on Kamchatka, more like a kaleidoscope, but then she should have focused on maximum 3 families and dig deeper, otherwise there is no character development at all, just 30+ different Russian names that even I, as a Russian-speaking person, was having a hard time to remember and set apart from each other!! The writing style was just OK for me, I was not blown away. So to sum it all up, I learned a bit about Kamchatka, I thought the beginning and the end were decent, but overall, I was not impressed and cannot recommend this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Crytzer Fry

    When I read the jacket copy for this book, I assumed it was a “who done it,” as the description talked about an ongoing police investigation. I don’t generally gravitate toward missing persons/abduction-type stories; but this is where I think the jacket copy is misleading. The jumping-off point for this book is the disappearance of two girls and its impact on the community. And as the book description states, the novel focuses on “the intimate lives of a cast of richly drawn, interconne When I read the jacket copy for this book, I assumed it was a “who done it,” as the description talked about an ongoing police investigation. I don’t generally gravitate toward missing persons/abduction-type stories; but this is where I think the jacket copy is misleading. The jumping-off point for this book is the disappearance of two girls and its impact on the community. And as the book description states, the novel focuses on “the intimate lives of a cast of richly drawn, interconnected characters.” I’m not sure how interconnected these characters really feel - or just how much of a role the girls' disappearance truly played in their storylines. So, for me, this novel read as a series of short stories which connect mostly on a thematic level. What does that mean to the reader? It means this literary novel will give you much to chew on and digest. Themes about the roles of women, the impact of the Berlin Wall's fall in Russia, and female and cultural oppression are prevalent. Lots to consider in this relatively small book! The author shines in her depiction of Russia’s tundra and volcanic backdrops, and does so with gorgeous, sensory writing. And she is adept at getting into the emotional hearts and minds of her characters with brevity and beautiful metaphorical imagery. Some examples: The hearth’s coals popped. She rolled onto her side to look. The coals were black, but still somehow crackling; she watched without understanding. Crackles getting louder. Only after a minute did she grasp the pops weren’t from the fire at all – the reindeer were passing outside the yurt. The noise that woke her was the motion of eight thousand delicate hooves stepping just beyond the canvas wall. AND Her heart had been fragile, its chambers shifting as easily and dangerously as volcanic earth. Slava got in there before the ground had hardened. I would recommend this book to readers who appreciate literary fiction, character-driven fiction and short stories. This author is talented! Many thanks to my book angel, who put this well-written novel into my hands in advance of publication!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tucker

    Many thanks to Knopf for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review DNF @ 50% You know something's wrong when you find yourself dreading reading a book. I just could not get into this. I feel really bad because I know that a lot of people loved it. Maybe I will pick it up some other time. For now, I am putting this on pause. | Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest |

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Disappearing Earth begins with a shot of adrenaline and ends with a gut punch. In between, it is filled with a forward propulsion of female characters who are intricately affected by the opening narrative: two young sisters who are kidnapped in broad daylight from the Kamchatka Peninsula in the far east section of Russia. To get a sense of what you’re in for, imagine if Jon McGregor’s Reservoir 13 was intermingled with Elizabeth’s Strout’s Olive Kitteridge. In the first book, a girl g Disappearing Earth begins with a shot of adrenaline and ends with a gut punch. In between, it is filled with a forward propulsion of female characters who are intricately affected by the opening narrative: two young sisters who are kidnapped in broad daylight from the Kamchatka Peninsula in the far east section of Russia. To get a sense of what you’re in for, imagine if Jon McGregor’s Reservoir 13 was intermingled with Elizabeth’s Strout’s Olive Kitteridge. In the first book, a girl goes missing; as the seasons unfold and the search goes on, village residents go about their daily living, coming together and breaking apart. In the second book, interwoven stories eventually coerce into a fulfilling whole. After the first chapter, the two young Golosovskaya sisters are no longer the focus; rather, other characters are introduced, each peripherally affected by the disappearance, and each suffering from her own private vulnerability and pain. We meet girls/women who have been spurned by bigots and by the judgments of small minds. These women range from Ksyusha, who is torn between her hometown white boyfriend and a compassionate young man she meets at a native folk dance group; Oksana, a potential kidnapping witness who experiences the pain of loss when her dog goes missing; the mother and sister of Lilia, a teenage girl who disappears years before without a trace; and Marina, the mother of the two missing sisters. Kamchatka plays its own role – a background location that is as mysterious, brooding, alienated and impenetrable as inner psyches of the women. This is a spellbinding, wonderfully imagined book that haunts the imagination.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Disappearing Earth isn’t your stereotypical thriller-mystery. Although this starts with the abduction of two little girls, it quickly diverges into a series of mini stories, each one centring on a different woman within the Russian peninsula, as the weeks and months pass following the girl’s disappearance. The stories are only loosely linked, with characters coming and going rapidly, and often have very little to do with the ongoin I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Disappearing Earth isn’t your stereotypical thriller-mystery. Although this starts with the abduction of two little girls, it quickly diverges into a series of mini stories, each one centring on a different woman within the Russian peninsula, as the weeks and months pass following the girl’s disappearance. The stories are only loosely linked, with characters coming and going rapidly, and often have very little to do with the ongoing investigation. Instead, we learn more about the various struggles these women face - from postnatal depression, anxiety, grief and loneliness and the emotional impact, with an almost rippling out effect, the girl’s disappearance has on the community as a whole. It’s a unique concept, and I applaud the author for trying something different from the norm. I have to admit I struggled with this at times though, and I think this is largely due to the short nature of the chapters and the vast array of characters, meaning I never really managed to connect with anyone on a deeper level. Often I would find that just as I got into someone’s story, the chapter would finish and the character never heard from again. The constant chopping and changing also disrupts the flow of the story and overall arc, with some chapters longer and more laborious than others, making the pace uneven and difficult to follow. I prefer a more linear approach to things, and found that by the end of the book I had simply lost interest in the girl’s story, making the ending largely anticlimactic. I also would have appreciated a bit more ‘world building’, with more descriptions of this desolate peninsula and its apparent remoteness, to help create more of an atmosphere and build up more creative tension. At times the story feels a little ‘flat’, without any real underlying threat - regardless of the mystery of the missing children. Some more ‘action’ or drama would have helped to pull me in. Decidedly unique storytelling concept, but I can’t help feeing that something is missing, with a cast of characters too large to support a rather intimate storyline.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    I keep rewriting my review for this book. I cannot get it right. I don't think I ever will, so I will stop trying. I will just say this: Two little girls disappear without a trace one day in Kamchatka, a Russian peninsula near Alaska. The police mount a search, but after months with no clues, they are forced to give up. Julia Phillips paints what has to be a bleak, unforgiving area of the world and gives it light, music, color and life. Her characters fit. They belong. They are par I keep rewriting my review for this book. I cannot get it right. I don't think I ever will, so I will stop trying. I will just say this: Two little girls disappear without a trace one day in Kamchatka, a Russian peninsula near Alaska. The police mount a search, but after months with no clues, they are forced to give up. Julia Phillips paints what has to be a bleak, unforgiving area of the world and gives it light, music, color and life. Her characters fit. They belong. They are part of what she is describing so well, community. The only other thing I can think to say is "Disappearing Earth" reminded me of "Snow Falling on Cedars." That is the kind of writer Phillips is. I received this book free from Alfred A. Knopf Publishers and Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Rothman

    The mysterious disappearance of two young girls from the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia is the fuel for this incredibly engaging novel about loss, hope, and the redeeming power of love. When the girls (who are sisters) vanish from their town, little to no clues are left behind them. The possible solution to the crime lies in a handful of people, each carrying their own tale of loss and hope. The novel, told as a sequence of stories whose characters are distantly or closely linked to one another, The mysterious disappearance of two young girls from the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia is the fuel for this incredibly engaging novel about loss, hope, and the redeeming power of love. When the girls (who are sisters) vanish from their town, little to no clues are left behind them. The possible solution to the crime lies in a handful of people, each carrying their own tale of loss and hope. The novel, told as a sequence of stories whose characters are distantly or closely linked to one another, and to the girls, spins a cobweb of clues to the sisters’ disappearance that tightens with every page. Toward the last third of the novel I couldn’t put the books down, and the ending (I won’t spoil it) is everything I’d hoped for and more—a realistic and beautiful portrait about the frailty of human life and our capacity for endurance.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    3.5 rounded down Disappearing Earth opens with two young sisters going missing in Kamchatka, a remote community in Siberia. From here on each chapter tells the story of a subsequent month after their disappearance but from the point of view of women in the community who have been impacted by the mystery. While at it's heart this is a mystery their disappearance and the police work takes somewhat of a backseat for a lot of the novel. The chapters read almost like interconnected short stories w/>Disappearing 3.5 rounded down Disappearing Earth opens with two young sisters going missing in Kamchatka, a remote community in Siberia. From here on each chapter tells the story of a subsequent month after their disappearance but from the point of view of women in the community who have been impacted by the mystery. While at it's heart this is a mystery their disappearance and the police work takes somewhat of a backseat for a lot of the novel. The chapters read almost like interconnected short stories which instead examine the issues other women in Kamchatka faces in their daily lives - dysfunctional relationships, family conflict, the widespread racism in the area against the "natives" - although the fear brought on by the crime features pretty heavily too. The writing is strong and Phillips develops some great characters, however I found the characters I liked most ended up with shorter chapters and we spent more time with characters I cared less about. This is probably just me, but I feel like we could have lost one or two of the later subplots as I failed to see what they added to the story. I can't be the only one who rates books in my mind as I'm going along, and this one started so strongly - a solid 4.5 - and then after the midway point slipped to something like a 2.5... so I'm settling on 3.5 rounded down as my final rating, because overall it was a pretty good debut. Thank you Netgalley and Simon and Schuster UK for the advance copy, which was provided in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    This book gives a wonderful introduction to a remote, and beautiful place, almost unknown to many of us. Kamchatka is a peninsula on the Russian Far East it extends from Siberia, and bordered by the Sea of Okhotsk and the North Pacific on either side. Its isolation is mentioned as being a long 9-hour flight to Moscow. The population consists of a majority of Russian descent and the Even ethnic minority, who herd reindeer and are the Indigenous people of the land. I thought the author evoked a v This book gives a wonderful introduction to a remote, and beautiful place, almost unknown to many of us. Kamchatka is a peninsula on the Russian Far East it extends from Siberia, and bordered by the Sea of Okhotsk and the North Pacific on either side. Its isolation is mentioned as being a long 9-hour flight to Moscow. The population consists of a majority of Russian descent and the Even ethnic minority, who herd reindeer and are the Indigenous people of the land. I thought the author evoked a vibrant sense of place: its mountains, verdant forests, active volcanos, and the extensive tundra regions. The numerous characters are well-written and come to life on the page. I found the lives of people so far away were unexpectedly very similar to our own, and it was a pleasure to identify with their tragedies, joy, pastimes and occupations. Thanks to the author for including a list identifying most of the main characters and their family groups. The book opens with the disappearance of two little sisters from around the capital, Petropavlovsk. Searches were made, and a police investigation, without results. What follows is not what I expected. I thought the following chapters would focus on solving the mystery of the girl’s’ disappearance by following a trail until the case is solved or closed. The author now goes in a completely different direction. Each of the following chapters represents a month since the girls vanished and ends just a year after the event. Each chapter focuses on local characters, some with only marginal memories of the event, and those most deeply affected. I admired this innovative approach in presenting the many diverse characters, their hopes and sorrows. I admit that I was not a fan of the book’s structure. Chapters were short stories in themselves, with different families and a cast of characters Some chapters seemed complete in themselves. A few of the characters showed up in other chapters, but their stories ended too abruptly, leaving me wanting to know more of the outcomes. There is a divide caused by the attitude of some Russians toward the Indigenous minority. Near the time that the little girls vanished, an older teenaged daughter of reindeer herders disappeared. Her mother is distraught, feeling that no resources given to look for her, unlike the futile help given to solve the mystery of the two missing girls of Russian descent. There is some resentment of foreign workers starting to move in. The disappearance of the little sisters resonates through the book, and we see how the tragedy has affected some of the other members of the community. I thought the chapters were more a technique to give the reader a better understanding and immerse them in the hearts and minds of people so far away. I thought this was skillfully done but didn’t quite work for me. What to say about the closing chapter? I haven’t decided yet if I loved or hated it, but I certainly wasn’t expecting how the book ended. I can’t wait to see what Julia Phillips writes next.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    This book reminded me a bit of Reservoir 13 in the way it deals with the year following the disappearance of a female character. Here, there's less about the changes in the natural world and more abut individuals, families, and communities. Phillips beautifully portrays the setting and lives of people in Russia's isolated Kamchatka Peninsula. The story was episodic, told a month at a time and moving across a fairly large set of characters. I can't say how many, because I listened to the audio, and This book reminded me a bit of Reservoir 13 in the way it deals with the year following the disappearance of a female character. Here, there's less about the changes in the natural world and more abut individuals, families, and communities. Phillips beautifully portrays the setting and lives of people in Russia's isolated Kamchatka Peninsula. The story was episodic, told a month at a time and moving across a fairly large set of characters. I can't say how many, because I listened to the audio, and even though the book was well narrated, I had trouble keeping everyone straight. The story moved slowly at times, but I enjoyed much about this book, and the ending satisfied me in a way that made me add an extra star. Quite a debut, Julia Phillips!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.