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The Kingdom of Copper

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Return to Daevabad in the spellbinding sequel to THE CITY OF BRASS. Nahri’s life changed forever the moment she accidentally summoned Dara, a formidable, mysterious djinn, during one of her schemes. Whisked from her home in Cairo, she was thrust into the dazzling royal court of Daevabadand quickly discovered she would need all her grifter instincts to survive there. Now, wit Return to Daevabad in the spellbinding sequel to THE CITY OF BRASS. Nahri’s life changed forever the moment she accidentally summoned Dara, a formidable, mysterious djinn, during one of her schemes. Whisked from her home in Cairo, she was thrust into the dazzling royal court of Daevabadand quickly discovered she would need all her grifter instincts to survive there. Now, with Daevabad entrenched in the dark aftermath of the battle that saw Dara slain at Prince Ali’s hand, Nahri must forge a new path for herself, without the protection of the guardian who stole her heart or the counsel of the prince she considered a friend. But even as she embraces her heritage and the power it holds, she knows she’s been trapped in a gilded cage, watched by a king who rules from the throne that once belonged to her familyand one misstep will doom her tribe. Meanwhile, Ali has been exiled for daring to defy his father. Hunted by assassins, adrift on the unforgiving copper sands of his ancestral land, he is forced to rely on the frightening abilities the maridthe unpredictable water spiritshave gifted him. But in doing so, he threatens to unearth a terrible secret his family has long kept buried. And as a new century approaches and the djinn gather within Daevabad's towering brass walls for celebrations, a threat brews unseen in the desolate north. It’s a force that would bring a storm of fire straight to the city’s gates . . . and one that seeks the aid of a warrior trapped between worlds, torn between a violent duty he can never escape and a peace he fears he will never deserve.


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Return to Daevabad in the spellbinding sequel to THE CITY OF BRASS. Nahri’s life changed forever the moment she accidentally summoned Dara, a formidable, mysterious djinn, during one of her schemes. Whisked from her home in Cairo, she was thrust into the dazzling royal court of Daevabadand quickly discovered she would need all her grifter instincts to survive there. Now, wit Return to Daevabad in the spellbinding sequel to THE CITY OF BRASS. Nahri’s life changed forever the moment she accidentally summoned Dara, a formidable, mysterious djinn, during one of her schemes. Whisked from her home in Cairo, she was thrust into the dazzling royal court of Daevabadand quickly discovered she would need all her grifter instincts to survive there. Now, with Daevabad entrenched in the dark aftermath of the battle that saw Dara slain at Prince Ali’s hand, Nahri must forge a new path for herself, without the protection of the guardian who stole her heart or the counsel of the prince she considered a friend. But even as she embraces her heritage and the power it holds, she knows she’s been trapped in a gilded cage, watched by a king who rules from the throne that once belonged to her familyand one misstep will doom her tribe. Meanwhile, Ali has been exiled for daring to defy his father. Hunted by assassins, adrift on the unforgiving copper sands of his ancestral land, he is forced to rely on the frightening abilities the maridthe unpredictable water spiritshave gifted him. But in doing so, he threatens to unearth a terrible secret his family has long kept buried. And as a new century approaches and the djinn gather within Daevabad's towering brass walls for celebrations, a threat brews unseen in the desolate north. It’s a force that would bring a storm of fire straight to the city’s gates . . . and one that seeks the aid of a warrior trapped between worlds, torn between a violent duty he can never escape and a peace he fears he will never deserve.

30 review for The Kingdom of Copper

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. 1.) The City of Brass ★★★★★ “It is time we get some vengeance for what they have done.” Friends, this was such a phenomenal installment that was such a treat to read. This is an own voices Muslim Fantasy series, and a historical setting of the early 1800s, which barely touches upon the Ottoman Empire. And The Kingdom of Copper picks up five years after the events of The City of Brass This is a story about djinn, and ma ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. 1.) The City of Brass ★★★★★ “It is time we get some vengeance for what they have done.” Friends, this was such a phenomenal installment that was such a treat to read. This is an own voices Muslim Fantasy series, and a historical setting of the early 1800s, which barely touches upon the Ottoman Empire. And The Kingdom of Copper picks up five years after the events of The City of Brass This is a story about djinn, and magical cities, and people being able to harness powers that they don’t fully understand. This is also a story about oppression, and privilege, and the terrible things people are willing to do in the name of pure blood. The mixed bloods in this world, shafits, are treated horribly and without a second thought. This book very much mirrors present day and the refugee crisis; people are unable to get food and shelter, while others are dying of things that could be easily healed, all because of fear, prejudices, and hatred. Our three main characters are all very separated and all living very different lives than when we last saw them in the first installment. But they all have also grown tremendously during the five years, and now all have very different goals. “A threat to a loved one is a more effective method of control than weeks of torture.” ➽ Nahri - gifted healer who is trapped in the royal court of Daevabad and trying to make the best out of an alliance that was forced upon her. ➽ Ali - djinn prince exiled by his father, constantly in fear for his life, while also trying to learn his new abilities. ➽ Dara - one of the best warriors, who is watching soldiers being rallied, who are willing to do terrible things in the name of peace. “Everyone knew about Darayavahoush, Nahri. They just couldn’t agree if he was a monster or a hero.” My biggest complaint about this second installment is how long it took for Dara and Nahri’s storylines to actually meet up. Obviously, I ship them pretty hard, so I was just really disappointed when it took forever for them to even interact with one another, especially with what Nahri believes. Also, as much as I love the queer side characters in this story, I’m not entirely sure how I liked how one of them was handled. Also, I very much thought Ali was going to give us some bisexual representation in this book, but it appears that we are just going to get a hetero love triangle, which makes me sad. But this story was impossible to put down, because I was so enthralled on every page. I feel like this 600+ page book was just completely packed with action, and I never wanted it to end. I love S.A. Chakraborty’s writing, and I think she really expertly crafts three very different characters, with three very different perspectives, all of which I completely adored. “You don’t stop fighting a war just because you’re losing battle” Overall, I really enjoyed this book, and the last line of this book will leave you utterly breathless. I have such high hopes for book three, and fully expect that it’s going to be a perfect conclusion with the way all the threads of this story leave off. This is such a beautiful Middle Eastern story, that ties in so much of the culture’s folklore in an absolutely beautiful and seamless way. I completely recommend this series with my whole heart. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch The quotes above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. Content and trigger warnings for graphic violence, torture, death, murder, slavery, human trafficking, talk of stillbirth, talk of past threat of rape, and war themes. Buddy read with Jocelyn at Yogi with a Book! ❤

  2. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    Can you ever make a new world that properly addresses the wounds of the past? - from Lightspeed interviewThe Kingdom of Copper is the second in S.A. Chakraborty’s Daevabad Trilogy, and it must be trying harder, as the first was amazing and this one is at least as good. I suppose you might pick this book up and have an entirely fine time reading it, but I would not advise it. If you have not read the first one, The City of Brass, jump on your flying carpet and dash off to your local bookstore. ( Can you ever make a new world that properly addresses the wounds of the past? - from Lightspeed interviewThe Kingdom of Copper is the second in S.A. Chakraborty’s Daevabad Trilogy, and it must be trying harder, as the first was amazing and this one is at least as good. I suppose you might pick this book up and have an entirely fine time reading it, but I would not advise it. If you have not read the first one, The City of Brass, jump on your flying carpet and dash off to your local bookstore. (Oh, and could you pick up some lamp oil at the bazaar on your way back? Thanks.) I suppose you could use one of your wishes to just make it appear, but really, that would be cheesy. It’s like Game of Thrones. Yeah, you can jump in at some point and catch up bit by bit, but, really, you have to be there from the beginning to get the most from it. Ditto here. Come back after you have read volume one, ok? And if you have already read #1, then Salaam and good evening to you, worthy friend. Shannon A. Chakraborty - image from her site So, when we left our heroes, Nahri, an orphan of a hustler from Cairo, who discovered she had skills, is stuck in Daevabad, the nominal city of the series title. Her buddy of a prince, Ali, had been banished from the kingdom for opposing his pop, the ruthless, genocidal, king Ghassan, and Darayavahoush (Dara to you and me), a complicated Djinn sort, monstrous warrior, hottie, and decent guy, was done in by said Prince Ali, although Ali may not have been entirely in charge of himself when it happened. There is at least one sand ship that flies through the story, and this was the closest image I could find – image from Munin’s sketchblog We are several years on. Nahri is married to Muntadhir, Ali’s older brother, the heir apparent, handsome, smart, and the epitome of Mr. Wrong. More of a political alliance than a love match. (Marry my son, or I will start slaughtering your people. Well, since you put it that way, sure.) Ali is making a life for himself in a desert town, using his newfound talent for things aqueous to locate underground water, or make it appear, or something. He is reluctant to make too much of a life for himself, as he remains the target of occasional assassins, and would spare potential family members the discomfort of having to plant him, or maybe get caught in the crossfire. Dara, who we thought was gone, is only sort-of gone. He is brought back from some plane of existence where he was wandering by forces that are less than divine, but hey, he gets to live a bit more, so whatev. On the other hand, Dara is enslaved again, made to take on a mission he would probably be happier skipping. (Mass slaughter is sooo last millennium) And he is stuck in a material form he is not thrilled with. So, a mixed bag. All three must contend with not only external hostile forces, but internal moral crossroads. (yeah, like Grand Central Station) The World of the Daevabad Trilogy – from the author’s site In book #1 we alternated between Nahri and Ali’s POV. This book adds Dara’s, although for far fewer pages than the other two. There is overlap, of course, as combinations of the three engage at diverse points. Political intrigue continues to be a major feature here. Very GoT, as sundry tribal groups (even within families) vie for influence, power, and turf. Instead of the Seven Kingdoms with their associated Targarians, Lannisters, and Starks, et al, there are tribes. The Geziri are the current ruling class, to which Ali, Muntadhir, and Ghassan belong. Nahri is of the Daeva group. Her ancestors used to rule in Daevabad, until the Geziris drove them out with extreme prejudice. Since you read the first volume, (you read it, right?) you know, it gets complicated. The City of Daevabad - image from author’s site The motive force for the story in Book #2, Nahri has discovered the remnants of an ancient Nahid hospital in less than wonderful shape, and seeks to have it restored so she can expand her work. In addition, she has learned of non-magical healers in the city, and looks to join with them to broaden her knowledge base and treat all the city’s residents. As one might imagine, this notion meets considerable resistance from those in power. (No, not Steve King) But with the help of Ali, whom she hates, by the way, for killing Dara, (Ali had gotten suckered into coming back to the city, wondering if he would be slaughtered when he arrived.) there is some hope of gettin’ ‘er done. It takes a village, though. Others are brought in to the attempt and politics are played. (Can’t we all just get along?) There is a big centennial event planned for the city, called Novatetem, Mardi Gras on steroids, parades, floats, feasts, competitions, and, well, there are folks who are planning some unpleasantness. The action accelerates as we get closer and closer, the November 1963 moment in Dallas, the coming hurricane, the ticking bomb. You know the deal. Michael Bay cum White Walkers cum ILM magnificence, and great fun. But also, with characters you care about trying to make it through. Image by Juan De Lara There are secrets aplenty, double-crosses, and some pretty neat magical tech. Toss in a few nifty large-scale monsters for good measure. One of the really cool things about the fabulous environment Chakraborty has created is that buildings constructed by the Nahid respond to Nahri, who is now the #1 Nahid in the place, so is referred to as Banu Nahri e-Nahid, (aka Banu Nahida) or Lady Nahri of the Nahid people, which comes with perks. Pictures on the walls of Nahid buildings animate when she passes. Things like that, and some that are more substantive. Pretty cool. In addition to the internal struggles with which each of the characters must cope, there are broader-scale motifs. The notion of Occupied People is a strong one in the book. [In medieval history] so many of these cities and civilizations were the products of waves of conquest. How does that shape the societies that survive them generations later? How do conqueror and conquered influence each other and how do their stories and legends of what happened get transmitted? Can you ever make a new world that properly addresses the wounds of the past? - from the Lightspeed interview Image from Shkyscrapercity.com It is a major challenge trying to figure out how to make peace with the travesties wrought on the Nahid by the Geziri, but also on others by the Nahid. How can you step off the eternal wheel of revenge and retribution, how can you heal the wounds of the past? In a very concrete way, Nahri attempts to do just that. Even though she was an impressive healer in book one, she was largely an uneducated one. But she has been working and studying hard, is learning some new tricks, and now, in a place that seems to act as a booster to her abilities, she is becoming an even better doctor. But can Nahri, in league with others, keep the city from descending into the usual cycle of eternal genocidal violence? Can she forgive Ali? Can she survive her crappy, shotgun marriage and her psycho genocidal father in law? It takes more than an ability to repair bodies to heal a city. Chakraborty’s decision to make Nahri a doctor grew out of her own experience. I wrote a lot of this while managing a large obstetrics & gynecology practice (while my husband went to medical school), and I really wanted to capture the messy reality of medicine. It’s not always glamourous and noble; it can be exhausting, the work is bloody and tiresome and challenging, and sometimes your patients are terrible. It requires a confidence bordering on arrogance to cut into a person for their own good, and I wanted to show how a character might grow into that. - from the QuilltoLive interview Image by Juan De Lara There are bits of humor sprinkled throughout. My favorite is when a shape-shifter with a fondness for turning into a statue, cannot get back to normal, and Nahri is stuck removing pieces of rock from him. “But it’s so peaceful,” he pleads. There is another LOL scene in which Ali is compelled by his father to taste some impressively appalling dishes from around the kingdom. A ref to a hospital room specially designed to keep floating djinn from injuring themselves puts one in mind of a Mary Poppins scene in which characters and furniture dispense with gravity. These were delightful. There are a lot of details to keep track of, tribes, places, words, characters. Thankfully appendices are provided, as are rather broad view maps, which I included here. My only disappointment with the book was that Dara did not get as much time as the other two, the definition of a quibble. Image from The Thief of Baghdad I’ve gotta say that volume 2 was a major page-turner for me. The ARE I read came in at 608 pages and I wished it were longer, really. (oops, there goes another wish. How many do I have left?) The action is almost non-stop. The characters are seriously engaging. There is actual character development. Moral considerations are treated seriously. There is real content woven into this fantasy world, an appreciation for the literary history of Islamic civilization, and there is wonderful creativity in the details of magic here. The Kingdom of Copper is pretty much all you could possibly wish for in a fantasy read. And you don’t even have to use up the limited supply in your special lamp. Review posted – January 18, 2019 Publication date – January 22, 2019 =============================EXTRA STUFF Links to the author’s personal, Twitter and FB pages Interviews -----SYFY Wire - S.A. Chakraborty's The City of Brass started out as history fan fiction - by Swapna Krishna Shannon Chakraborty didn’t want to be a writer when she grew up. “I wanted to be a historian, but I’ve been a bookworm since I was a kid,” she said. She originally wanted to be a historian, with a specialization in the Middle East. “That plan got a bit derailed for a variety of reasons, one of which was graduating in 2008 when the economy collapsed, so I figured I’d work while my husband went to medical school and keep my mind occupied with a little world-building/historical fan fiction,” she explains. It’s that experience that led Chakraborty, who was born raised in New Jersey by blue-collar Catholic parents, to the seed that became The City of Brass. “It sprouted the day I set foot in the rare books library of the American University of Cairo,” she explains. There she lost herself in the stories and lore around her. “As a homesick, homework-laden, and rather wide-eyed new Muslim myself, I found in these stories a refuge; they spoke of a history that dazzled, a faith of breathtaking diversity in which my weird background was nothing new nor particularly noteworthy.” -----The Quill to Live - The City of Brass – An Interview With S. A. Chakraborty I come from a pretty big family and always enjoy seeing well-done portrayals of complicated, messy, exasperating and yet also still loving relatives; I think it’s a thing many of us can relate to. And I’ve always had a particular fascination with rival princes. They’re fairly common in history, and yet I can’t imagine the emotions that go behind making a decision to war against your own brother. There was certainly some inspiration from my own family. My twin brother and I are very close, and I was very protective of him, especially when we were younger, even when we were fighting. This was definitely an emotion and dynamic that I was trying to capture with Muntadhir and Ali. Though my brother isn’t a wealthy, libertine playboy destined to rule a shaky kingdom so the similarities end there! -----Pen America - On Magic, History, and Storytelling: The PEN Ten with S. A. Chakraborty by Lily Philpott – an interesting, wide-ranging chat -----Lightspeed Magazine - Interview: S.S. Chakraborty - by Christian A. Coleman – Lots of excellent information here Items of Interest -----The World of Daevabad on the author’s site -----Barnes & Noble - From City to Kingdom: S.A. Chakraborty on Building the Magical World of the Daevabad Trilogy - this is credited as B&N editors, but seems really the author talking about the development of her magical world -----My review of Book #1 in the Daevabad Trilogy, The City of Brass

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aimal (Bookshelves & Paperbacks)

    Please note this review contains spoilers for the first book in the series. A big thank you to Harper Voyager for sending me a copy for review! The sequel to S. A. Chakraborty’s magnificent The City of Brass largely takes place five years after the events of the first book. There’s a prologue at the beginning, detailing the immediate aftermath for each of our three main characters. However, the major bulk of the novel takes place several years after Darayavahoush’s ‘death,’ Alizaydi al Qahtani’s p Please note this review contains spoilers for the first book in the series. A big thank you to Harper Voyager for sending me a copy for review! The sequel to S. A. Chakraborty’s magnificent The City of Brass largely takes place five years after the events of the first book. There’s a prologue at the beginning, detailing the immediate aftermath for each of our three main characters. However, the major bulk of the novel takes place several years after Darayavahoush’s ‘death,’ Alizaydi al Qahtani’s possession by the marid and subsequent exile, and Nahri’s political arranged marriage to the crowned prince of Daevabad. In The Kingdom of Copper, we witness each of these characters embark on a journey quite unlike anything they’ve ever experienced before. Nahri finds herself surrounded with strangers, her previous allies (Ali and Dara) nowhere to be found. For five years, she must navigate royal life and the palace alone. Although her relationship with her husband Muntadhir is cordial, Nahri nevertheless feels utterly alone. With nobody but her mentor by her side, she continues to practice healing as best as she can. Alizayd al Qahtani builds for himself a life in exile in the barren lands of Bir Nabat. With his newfound abilities with water, Ali can play an especially useful role in the sustenance of his new home. He forms new alliances, new friendships, and has become comfortable in this new-found life. Darayavahoush has been brought back to life by Manizheh, much to his dismay, in a physical form that he is enraged by. Manizheh is laying down plans to take back Daevabad, and restore the Daeva tribe to its original glory with the Nahids at its head. Dara reverts back to his old role as a dutiful warrior, and is forced to face his past while making decisions about his future. The City of Brass is a sweeping epic fantasy, chock-full of djinn and mythical creatures, lavish world-building, political intrigue, a romance fraught with tension, and characters you will grow deeply attached to. What The City of Brass did best, believe it or not, this sequel does even better. The world-building is switched up two notches, as we get to see more characters (albeit minor ones) from other tribes. Scenes such as feasts and festivals allow the reader to see short, but detailed, glimpses of these other tribes’ cultures and customs, while more minor characters are introduced that are not from the Daeva or Geziri tribes. We encountered some mythical creatures, such as rivers that turn into serpents, and winged reptiles, but we see even more. There is far more magic in this book than there was in the first one, including elemental magic at the hands of Ali, and Nahri’s strange bond with the Nahid palace, as well as Dara’s new physical form. The history of Daevabad and its tribes is further expanded upon. The enhancement in the already complex world-building makes the reading experience lush and captivating. One of this series’s absolute defining points is its foundational emphasis on politics. Daevabad is a ‘melting pot’ of a city, but it far from embraces the diversity within its walls. The shafit (half-djinn, half-human) are brutally oppressed, and the royal family’s bloody history with the Daeva tribe doesn’t help, either. There are prejudices among the different tribes towards each other that have lasted centuries. The tension between all these factions has always existed in this story, but while it simmers and bubbles in the first book, this tension transforms and explodes into true action in The Kingdom of Copper. With scheming, shady tactics, stubborn royals, rebellious princes, and Nahri determined to bring peace in the middle, the politics is taken to entirely new levels. It’s dangerous. Exciting, yet often disturbing in its sheer realness. In fact, what makes this sequel so exciting is just how different it is from the first book without ever straying too far from its foundation. It never rambles or subverts from the main plot of the series, but despite this, it seems entirely new, especially with regards to its characters. For example: in the first book, Nahri is very dependent on Dara, as he is her Afshin, someone who she knows and trusts in a sea of strangers. Her character was inexplicably tied to his, almost as if they were a package-deal. Their bond seemed so vital to the first story that its physical absence in The Kingdom of Copper made me wary – but I need not have been. It felt new, seeing them in such separate places to the point where Nahri doesn’t even know he’s alive for 90% of the book, but you could still sense their deep regard of each other throughout. Dara and Nahri don’t interact in this book until much later on, and this may discourage readers, but I think this decision allowed both characters to become their own people. Separating these two also allowed for more character development than could have been possible if they had remained a package-deal. The book also felt new, because it was a lot less Nahri-centric than the first book. Chakraborty allows her other characters’ arcs and development to take center stage. Ali’s inner struggle with his possession by the marid, his own moral and religious values clashing with his duties to his family are fully fleshed out in this book. His warring loyalties and him coming to terms with what he ultimately values breathes new life into an already multi-dimensional, nuanced character, and I came to appreciate him ten-fold in this book. Dara’s narrative is especially fascinating, because we haven’t seen his perspective before. In this new time in his life, Dara is forced into a position in the narrative where he has to make a choice between his duty and wanting peace. Where the burden of his history and having to repeat his history is placed upon his shoulders. It’s hard to watch a character you love make bad decisions, but it makes narrative sense. And the complexity of these characters’ decisions and your constant “You’re doing the wrong thing, but I don’t want to see you get hurt either” is what makes this story so compelling. The side characters, such as Ali’s siblings (Muntadhir and Zaynab) and Jamshid are given more time to shine, too. Their characters have their own internal and external conflicts. Ali’s relationship with Muntadhir has pretty much disintegrated, and seeing them fight as brothers – be cruel and petty and hurtful – was so exciting. We all know and love the main trio, but what makes this sequel soar above its predecessor is how much you learn to love these side characters too. The antagonists in Manizheh and Ghassan were also incredible to watch, where they both have horrifying and redeeming qualities. It almost reminds me of Game of Thrones in its complexity. There are two awful people leading opposite sides of the conflict; so who do you root for? It puts the reader in a strange position where you’re rooting for people on both sides of the conflict, and you see two characters you love at each others’ throats, willing to do horrible things to each other. I’m incredibly excited for the third book, albeit dreading it because it means it’ll be an end to a series I have grown to love and cherish. The truth is, I could talk forever about why I love this series, these characters and this world, and it’s hard for me to stop at a suitable place. But all I can say is that this series is a gem, and it could make its place on the shelf of fantasy greats if people gave it the chance. I’m so glad I gave it this chance; it’s been the best reading decision I’ve made in years. Connect with me elsewhere: Bloglovin' ☽ Twitter ☽ Instagram ☽ Tumblr ☽ Facebook

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    4.5 stars! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature: The Kingdom of Copper, the second book in S.A. Chakraborty’s DAEVABAD TRILOGY, picks up soon after the ending of the first book, The City of Brass. Alizayd (Ali) al Qahtani, younger son of Ghassan, the king of Daevabad, has been exiled and is fair game for assassins. He's rescued by a raiding party from the drought-ridden area of Bir Nabat, who have noticed Ali’s newly-developed magical ability to summon water. Nahri has been forced by 4.5 stars! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature: The Kingdom of Copper, the second book in S.A. Chakraborty’s DAEVABAD TRILOGY, picks up soon after the ending of the first book, The City of Brass. Alizayd (Ali) al Qahtani, younger son of Ghassan, the king of Daevabad, has been exiled and is fair game for assassins. He's rescued by a raiding party from the drought-ridden area of Bir Nabat, who have noticed Ali’s newly-developed magical ability to summon water. Nahri has been forced by Ghassan into a loveless match with his older son Muntadhir, the pleasure-loving crown prince. Darayavahoush, the powerful djinn with a long and unspeakably violent past, is summoned from his sister’s side in the land of the dead to a new life by Nahri’s outlaw mother Manizheh, who controls Dara’s emerald slave ring and has plans to use him for her political takeover of the djinn's city of Daevabad. After setting the stage, the story jumps forward five years. Nahri, who has long felt trapped by the royal family, finds new inspiration in her plan to restore a long-ruined hospital, helping the outcast shafit, who are of human/djinn mixed blood, as well as pureblooded djinn, or daeva. Ali’s magical affinity for water has brought new life to Bir Nabat, changing it from a wasteland to a fruitful place where Ali has found safety and respect. But political forces are combining to bring Ali back to Daevabad and into danger. And Dara has become Manizheh’s military advisor, helping her plan an invasion of Daevabad to retake the city from Ghassan and the Geziri tribe, who have controlled it for many years. It’s always a pleasant surprise for me when the second book of a series isn’t a let-down, and I consider The Kingdom of Copper a better book than The City of Brass. Most of the confusing elements from the first book have been worked out. The plot is far more coherent and focused, and the pacing has noticeably improved. This is just excellent story-telling! The point of view shifts between Nahri, Ali and Dara, but each of their stories pulled me in, and it was easy to see the connection points between the three plot threads and point-of-view characters. Each of these characters has a distinct challenge to overcome in his or her life, and in the process questions who they really are and what they want to achieve. It’s not a simple answer in any of their cases. Nahri and Ali both have parents who they love, but cannot agree with their actions. Dara is bound to assist Manizheh with her invasion, but has serious reservations about her plans. This complexity of character extends itself to the secondary characters. It’s refreshing to see characters that I had dismissed as one-dimensional (Nahri’s husband Muntadhir is a good example) begin to display unexpected depths. Ghassan’s tyranny is indisputable, but it’s easy to see how his reign began with good intentions. The related themes of conquest and oppression, so prevalent in The City of Brass, are explored in some new ways. Manizheh considers the city rightly hers, but her plans for taking it over begin to look suspiciously like the same methods her enemies used long ago. Revenge and violence are poisons that can make you morally indistinguishable from your enemies. Nahri’s efforts to rebuild the hospital and to serve shafit as well as Daeva may hold the seeds for cooperation and peace, but is it too late? The Kingdom of Copper was both heart-wrenching and a pleasure to read. It’s certainly not all heavy and downbeat; there are doses of humor and enchanting magic, like the palace stairs that rise to help Nahri when she’s fleeing her enemy, along with the passageways that magically brick themselves up behind her. And it’s easy to root for the three main characters ― even Dara, by far the most morally gray of the trio. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book … even without the cliffhanger ending that promises to be a major game-changer! Initial post: Me at 60%: I think I actually like this sequel better than the first book! Update: YES. Yes, it is better than the first book! Genie djinni Daeva battles FTW! I received a free review copy of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss. Thank you!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roshani Chokshi

    Chakraborty's debut, CITY OF BRASS, was one of my top 10 reads of the year. Kingdom of Copper is without a doubt in my top 5 of 2019. Sprawling and opulent, the world of Daevabad and it's fascinating magical intrigue soars to new heights in this sequel. I continue to cheer for Nahri. Dahra is conflicted and broody as ever, and Ali...Oh Ali. He is my heart. I just want him to be happy *weeps*. Chakraborty pulls every emotional string with this sequel. At its heart, it is a story of family and the Chakraborty's debut, CITY OF BRASS, was one of my top 10 reads of the year. Kingdom of Copper is without a doubt in my top 5 of 2019. Sprawling and opulent, the world of Daevabad and it's fascinating magical intrigue soars to new heights in this sequel. I continue to cheer for Nahri. Dahra is conflicted and broody as ever, and Ali...Oh Ali. He is my heart. I just want him to be happy *weeps*. Chakraborty pulls every emotional string with this sequel. At its heart, it is a story of family and the choices we have to live with, and I am DYING for the conclusion.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kilikina

    3.5 stars. The Kingdom of Copper was my most anticipated book of 2019, hands down. Ever since I finished The City of Brass, I couldn’t wait to read this sequel. I was counting down the days; my anticipation for this was so high. I am so upset that I didn’t love this more... :( The second half, more specifically the last 30% or so, was really the redeeming part of this. I really, really struggled to get through this. That’s something I NEVER anticipated. I feel like everything I adored in The Cit 3.5 stars. The Kingdom of Copper was my most anticipated book of 2019, hands down. Ever since I finished The City of Brass, I couldn’t wait to read this sequel. I was counting down the days; my anticipation for this was so high. I am so upset that I didn’t love this more... :( The second half, more specifically the last 30% or so, was really the redeeming part of this. I really, really struggled to get through this. That’s something I NEVER anticipated. I feel like everything I adored in The City of Brass was just nonexistent here. Sometimes it hooked me, but I was never truly transfixed or captivated while reading this. The first book was magical and so engrossing, this was missing that. I kept reading for the sake of my love for the first book, I had to see if this eventually got better. And thankfully it did, but it took so long to get to that point. I should be dying to read the third book, but instead I’m left feeling sad that I didn’t love this. I’m sincerely hoping the last book turns my feelings for this series around. Thoughts before reading: ——————— ME AFTER READING THE LAST LINE OF THE DESCRIPTION ________ UPDATE: release date pushed back to January 2019........⚰️⚰️⚰️ Dying for even a SLIVER of info about this! 😩

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adah Udechukwu

    The Kingdom of Copper is undoubtedly the best novel I have read this year. The novel is rich in details, politics, religion, culture........ everything.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    I really enjoyed this one and I am super glad that I have audiobooked both of these as I think the narrator gives a more immersive look at the Egyptian-inspired culture of this world. This is a sequel so I cannot say too much about the plot, but I will say that I thoroughly enjoyed the direction this book took, and although I have some small quibbles with some of the ways that the author acted, I think it's a whole lot of fun to read through too. Nahri is our main character throughout the series I really enjoyed this one and I am super glad that I have audiobooked both of these as I think the narrator gives a more immersive look at the Egyptian-inspired culture of this world. This is a sequel so I cannot say too much about the plot, but I will say that I thoroughly enjoyed the direction this book took, and although I have some small quibbles with some of the ways that the author acted, I think it's a whole lot of fun to read through too. Nahri is our main character throughout the series, but we also follow Dara and Ali who have become very key players in the world of Daevabad too. I think that they all have something unique to bring, Ali is overly caring, sometimes too much; Nahri is a character trapped by others but determined to do good and use what power she does have; Dara is a character whose story has taken quite a few meandering turns, but he now serves a woman with the potential to destroy a lot of people. I like each of them in their own way and they also all frustrate me at times, but I think this makes them realistic and I think that the politics and crazy manoeuvring of these characters keeps you on your toes :) I definitely recommend it and I think that this is a series a lot of people who want a new setting for fantasy would enjoy. 4*s from me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fadwa (Word Wonders)

    CW: Violence, murder, excessive drinking/alcoholism, mention of self-harm, death of a few side characters, mass murder, segregation, racism, gore. *I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange of an honest review* Full review originally posted on my blog: Word Wonders Question: What do you do when you read your most anticipated book ever and it turns out to be your favourite book ever? Answer: You cry. You just cry and cry and cry. Seriously , it’s almost been a month since I’ve fin CW: Violence, murder, excessive drinking/alcoholism, mention of self-harm, death of a few side characters, mass murder, segregation, racism, gore. *I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange of an honest review* Full review originally posted on my blog: Word Wonders Question: What do you do when you read your most anticipated book ever and it turns out to be your favourite book ever? Answer: You cry. You just cry and cry and cry. Seriously , it’s almost been a month since I’ve finished The Kingdom of Copper at the time where I’m writing this review, and it’s still consuming my every thought. HOW DO I MOVE ON FROM A BOOK THAT’S RUINED ME? I still don’t compute how it managed to surpass my expectations by so much when they were already through the roof and I have no clue how to write this review. The writing is absolutely exquisite just like in The City of Brass. It immersed me right back into the story and the world from the very first few sentences, that’s just how atmospheric and magical it is. The description are also incredibly immersive, they feel like a living thing, a character of their own, I could easily imagine myself in every scene of the book, feeling myself between its pages, so much so that I found myself thinking “I need to go back and finish the movie…oh…wait no, it’s a book”. It’s my favourite book. It’s the book that’s caused my downfall. *cries*. The Kingdom of Copper picks up five years after the end of The City of Brass which I didn’t expect and shook me when I started reading but it worked so wonderfully for the story. It gave time to things that needed to happen and develop and would’ve made for boring storytelling and taken up unnecessary page space to happen organically and for the story to pick up at a point where more crucial-to-the-plot things happen. And that is an incredibly smart move on the author’s part if you ask me. Because it made this book the strongest, mind-blowing sequel I’ve ever read. It made it the best book I’ve ever read, period. Starting my read I thought I knew everything there was to know about the world, that I was well armed to face anything Chakraborty decides to throw at me because it doesn’t get any worse than the first book, and well… I’M BOO BOO THE FOOL! The world is complex and so deeply studied and detailed that the more I read the more I learned and the more I realized how little I actually knew. There are so many layers to the world, the history, the plot, the characters, the politics, the secrets, that I just kept flipping page after page desperate to know more, to know everything. What I loved most is that this book expanded outside Daevabad. And I know what you’re going to say, the first book did as well. But not in the same way. Whereas that one was a journey book, this one scattered our main characters and we got to see other places as more than a passing by scenery. And we also see more of Daevabad, learn more about each specific quarters and their inhabitants as well as the flimzy relationships and shaky peace between all of them. The plot of The Kingdom of Copper is a lot more intricate and fast paced than that of The City of Brass and when I say a lot, I mean A LOT. It’s just so heart stopping, head spinning and I honest to God did not catch a break for the whole 600+ pages. And I don’t mean that every second of it is a battle, not at all, but there’s this tension and sense of urgency through it all that made me feel like something would go wrong in the next page, the next sentence I read. It’s still highly relying on the politics and scheming and if you ask me, that’s the best thing. Because every character is calculating, not knowing who to really trust, always watching their backs and OOF the stress. While being a high fantasy story, The Kingdom of Copper also manages to tackle some very human, very timely topics and that’s reason #57583292 it’s my favourite book. First off, we have racism and segregation, the Shafit who are mixed between Jinn and humans are treated like dirt by most “pureblood” Jinns and the author doesn’t just mention that in surface level, she also digs deep and explores in gritty detail the workings and repercussions of such discrimination in that Jinn society. Don’t get me wrong, this is a thing in the first book as well, but with the political climate changing, bigots start getting louder and more violent, which… is a horrifying mirror copy of our current world. Then at the center of the book is an incredible exploration of human motivations, especially revenge, and how far people who are consumed by it can be willing to go to achieve their plot, even if their purpose starts off noble, it twists it and turns it until they’re willing to go to any lengths, even the most obscure ones to get their vengeance. In addition to that, it talks and shows extensively how people’s actions don’t exist inside a vacuum and can and do affect other people, even those who seem far away and removed from a situation as first glance. In this second installment of The Daevabad trilogy, we have an additional point of view, which you might or might know who it is (you should know, it’s obvious), and having that was definitely…enlightening. With three point of views, all of them scattered in different places, at least at first, we get a much wider look at what’s happening as well as a more rounded backstory of the characters as well as the historical events that led to the world to being what it is in the story. As I said, this is a five year jump into the future, so naturally characters have changed and matured (while still being the lovable messy dumbasses we know and love), they’re so three dimensional and well crafted that you can see that time has passed through their actions, while still being the same at their core. They’re more guarded, more jaded, less naive, and have a bit of wisdom about them. And at the center of all this growth is Nahri. I am thoroughly, hopelessly and irrevocably in love with her. I did love her in the first book but if you’ve read my review of that one, she wasn’t my favourite character, now she is, my favourite in this series and hands down my favourite female character of all time. She’s just a phenomenal character. Still the pragmatic sometimes selfish girl we met and loved in book one but in this one she understands that her purpose is bigger than she is and acts accordingly. She’s strong and grows confident and comfortable in her powers while still acknowledging her weaknesses and that she still has a lot to learn. She’s also SO DONE with the men all around her trying to make decisions for her and I LIVED for that, she was so fierce in the face of that and knew when to defend herself and when to hold back. She still miscalculated and made mistakes though. Ali on the other hand is the exact same fool. While he’s grown too and became less preachy and sees the world as more than his previous black/white dichotomy, but if anything he’s just grown more set in his ways and convictions, but he lost his idealism. Eventhough he still struggles taming down his views when all they do is create more trouble for him, something about the way he approached them was different, in The City of Brass he spoke a lot because he had a bit of aloofness to him whereas in this one he has more of “I have nothing to lose and this cause it bigger than I am” to his actions. And I adored him more as well. Dara is one I…have more of a complicated relationship with. OF COURSE, I still love him because I’m trash, but I didn’t love his actions and the way he lost what drove him in the first book. But the thing is it was the perfect thing for his character at this point in the story, with how things progressed, his belief system and undying devotion to the Nahids, every single one of his actions made sense. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. So I couldn’t even hate what was done to his character, because it was right and anything else would’ve been off. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t get frustrated with him and the fact that he lost his fire, it doesn’t mean that I didn’t yell at him to square up both internally ande externally. I still love him though. I still love him. *cries* And that ending? THAT ENDING? I’M SUPPOSED TO BE OKAY AFTER THE AUTHOR PULLED THAT STUNT? I’M JUST SUPPOSED TO LIVE ON AS IF NOTHING HAPPENED? I’M SUPPOSED TO WAIT OVER A YEAR FOR THE NEXT BOOK AND TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS TO MY FAVOURITES? *takes deep breath* It’s fine. It’s okay. I’m okay. (narrator: she was not okay)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nastassja

    **This review now posted on my blog** May I present you my first disappointment of 2019! I don't know how but everything went wrong in this book. When I first read The City of Brass I was enchanted by its magical atmosphere and characters who swept me away into the world of djinn, flying carpets, giant water serpents and enormous talking birds. I loved everything about that world! I had zero doubt The Kingdom of Copper would deliver the same level of grandeur and will, once more, sweep me off my **This review now posted on my blog** May I present you my first disappointment of 2019! I don't know how but everything went wrong in this book. When I first read The City of Brass I was enchanted by its magical atmosphere and characters who swept me away into the world of djinn, flying carpets, giant water serpents and enormous talking birds. I loved everything about that world! I had zero doubt The Kingdom of Copper would deliver the same level of grandeur and will, once more, sweep me off my feet. At the end of the day it kind of did sweep me off, lending me on my back hard with an enormous bruise to nurse until the year of 2021 - this is when book 3 will be out, and my hope of ever redeeming The Daevabad Trilogy. What landed me the most painful downfall in a while is the fact that probably 'it's not you it's me' syndrome that I hate because it leaves me undecided and torn between loving and hating something. So, what I didn't like in The Kingdom of copper, but which is not considered to be an actual flaw of the story but only a failure of my expectations which are biased, of course. 🔥 The Kingdom of Copper is in no way young adult. In book one characters were 20 something years old already (and older), in book two the plot picks up after five years later from the book's one events. Which was a bummer if you ask me! I am opposed to big-time jumps in my books because I feel disconnected from the storyline and frightened of the things that might've happened during those five years we - readers- missed. And here we: a lot of considerable changes happened, one of the important ones: the heroine got married! Now, I get that it was an inevitable move in five years time, but I hate it with my whole heart! 🔥 The Kingdom of Copper is really hard on politics. Now, I don't read a lot of adult fantasy because of the hard intricacies of politics and the world. Yes, I prefer my books to be harder on a fantasy aspect and less hard on the political aspect. Don't get me wrong, I love me good political intrigue in a book, but when you have to read almost 700 pages of politics you kind of get bored or annoyed or both. It felt like the story lost its magic and charm. The characters hardened so much I didn't recognize them! And I hated those five years gape which disconnected me from my beloved characters. 🔥 The Kingdom of Copper turned from star-crossed lovers to four-sides-lovers (it's my fancy way to announce a love square). It's a mess and I want to make a facepalm every time I think about the romance part. I hate Nahri's husband because he's a despicable sand fly who uses Nahri but loves another man. I would forgive him that - because I get that he didn't have a say in this marriage - if he wasn't also a palace-slut who sleeps with any skirt he can find. The situation is worsened by the fact that Nahri kind of likes her husband and tries really hard to find common ground with him, and he always shuts her out. So yeah, I am sorry-not-sorry for my slut-shaming of that characters. Then there's Ali who had a beautiful friendship with Nahri but now we find out that he actually feels more? And it's thrown in our faces like the fact we have to accept. Why the fuck can't we have a normal woman-man friendship without turning it into a fucking romance?! These are the three enormous pillars of destruction and ruination of my fascination with this series. Of course, things are complicated (when they are not?!) and the last 20% of the book make me hopefull things might get better? Doubtful but hopeful? I am in a state when I am torn between loving and hating the series. So I will let book 3 be the judge and prosecutor of my final decision.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

    2/27/19 UPDATE ALL THAT WAITING AND I HAVE TO SAY, IT WAS WORTH IT! I'll make sure to add a review later, but at first glance this book takes everything that was so amazing about the first book and MAKES IT BETTER. What really blew me away about the first book was the complex characters and the dynamics between them, and let me tell you, S.A. CHAKRABORTY DID IT AGAIN! Every character is such a profound mix of good, bad, and everything in-between, and their motivations, emotions, and struggles all 2/27/19 UPDATE ALL THAT WAITING AND I HAVE TO SAY, IT WAS WORTH IT! I'll make sure to add a review later, but at first glance this book takes everything that was so amazing about the first book and MAKES IT BETTER. What really blew me away about the first book was the complex characters and the dynamics between them, and let me tell you, S.A. CHAKRABORTY DID IT AGAIN! Every character is such a profound mix of good, bad, and everything in-between, and their motivations, emotions, and struggles all struck me as genuine and true, even those of the characters who weren't my favorites. Add in the themes of a painful and bloody history, retaliation, hatred, fear, and the struggle to overcome these things and it makes for a profound and hugely entertaining read. Also, THAT ENDING, I AM DYING. And I thought the wait for this one was bad MY GOD. I don't know how I'm going to make it all the way to 2020 for The Empire of Gold, but I know the wait is going to be brutal. PREVIOUS REVIEW/THOUGHTS: My experiences with The Daevabad Trilogy thus far: A Graphic Journey Me upon finishing The City of Brass: Me upon realizing I have to wait 11 whole months until I can read the Kingdom of Copper: Me, waiting for the next installment of this series like:

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Waworga

    HOLYHELL!! City Of Brass was one of my fav book on 2017, ive waited 1 year and 2 months to be able to read this and maaaaan... it was worthy!! It was woooow so intense and so amazing and so stressful too at the same time!! The writing style was so enjoyable, love it from page 1 until page 609! i still cant believe this series was a debut from the author, the plot was such a masterpiece and well crafted! Love all the 3 POVs here and i must said i never been so conflicted to choose side on book cau HOLYHELL!! City Of Brass was one of my fav book on 2017, ive waited 1 year and 2 months to be able to read this and maaaaan... it was worthy!! It was woooow so intense and so amazing and so stressful too at the same time!! The writing style was so enjoyable, love it from page 1 until page 609! i still cant believe this series was a debut from the author, the plot was such a masterpiece and well crafted! Love all the 3 POVs here and i must said i never been so conflicted to choose side on book cause everyone have their own reasons and beliefs and their own sins too The Last 100 pages epic battle is EVERYTHING omg EVERYTHING, it was intense and heartbreak and asjkasjk i lost my words The only "small" thing i dont really like here was the romance but i think i can deal with that Now i dont know what im doing with my life while waiting for the final book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Burns

    4.5 Stars Review: *I received a copy of this book from the publisher. This has not influenced my review.* It is such a treat to find books that are this detailed and nuanced and feel so real. The writing, the characters, the story, the world building, it all came together so perfectly and was so well done that it felt like I was reading about real people. This was one of those books that legitimately made me forget I was reading. I was just there, fully immersed in the story. Much like in the first 4.5 Stars Review: *I received a copy of this book from the publisher. This has not influenced my review.* It is such a treat to find books that are this detailed and nuanced and feel so real. The writing, the characters, the story, the world building, it all came together so perfectly and was so well done that it felt like I was reading about real people. This was one of those books that legitimately made me forget I was reading. I was just there, fully immersed in the story. Much like in the first book, the characters were so complex and believably flawed. I feel like I can't talk about them individually without spoilers, but gosh, they were all so well-written, and I had such mixed feelings about some of them because I liked them and wanted them to be ok, yet it also felt wrong to just let slide some of the things they've done. I felt terrible for so many of them though. All the main characters were stuck between a rock and a hard place. Some of the supporting characters were in tough positions too. And as things got worse and worse, I felt terrible for everyone for other reasons as well. There was just so much betrayal and heartache and shock and guilt and grief and confusion among them. That brings me to another thing I yet again loved: The author did such a great job of showing the complexity of conflict, and because I got to see POVs on multiple sides, I didn't even know who to root for. All sides were right in some ways. All were wrong in some ways. I didn't want to see any lives lost, but there was no easy fix, not when so many of players on the board wanted vengeance and power and were all too happy to resort to violence to get it or keep it. But it wasn't just the big conflict this author portrayed well. There was conflict among family, and the author really captured how complicated feelings for family members can be. There was also conflict within characters, when they had to make decisions with no easy answers. Another thing this book did brilliantly was that it kept building the tension higher and higher and higher as it went on. Things kept getting more and more complicated and tangled and messed up in that way where you just know bad things are gonna happen, but you don't yet know what. It was unpredictable and gripping. At times it was dark and full of violence and chaos. And when everything did start crashing, it was intense. This is a 600+ page book, but I wasn't bored for even a single moment. There's also a surprising amount of humor in these books. I wouldn't classify them as funny books because that's not the main point, but there are little bits of humor sprinkled throughout, and I really love them. Last but not least, I want to yet again mention how much I love this portrayal of djinn. They're so detailed and interesting with their powers and their hidden city and their history and their society. Overall, this was an amazing book with a gripping plot, complex characters and relationships, so much tension, and such a great portrayal of djinn, and it completely sucked me in! Recommended For: Fans of Book 1 in S.A. Chakraborty's Daevabad Trilogy. Anyone who likes djinn, detailed worlds, complex characters, and royal court politics. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight ----------------------- Initial Thoughts: How long do I have to wait for the next book because ??!?!?!!!?!?!

  14. 5 out of 5

    ♚ ember

    I would, like, 600% sell my soul to an ifrit to have this book in my hands right now. where are magic lamps when you need them?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice in Bookland

    “It is time we get some vengeance for what they have done.” 1. The city of brass ★★★★★ 4.5 I'm legit still thinking about this book and I finished it days ago. Damn. What a book. But let's start with the actual review. I had very high expectations for The kingdom of copper - being The city of brass one of my favorite books - and let me tell you: S. A. Chakraborty did not disappoint. Her writing style keeps being enchanting and rich but never heavy. She also brings such an original and interesting topi “It is time we get some vengeance for what they have done.” 1. The city of brass ★★★★★ 4.5 I'm legit still thinking about this book and I finished it days ago. Damn. What a book. But let's start with the actual review. I had very high expectations for The kingdom of copper - being The city of brass one of my favorite books - and let me tell you: S. A. Chakraborty did not disappoint. Her writing style keeps being enchanting and rich but never heavy. She also brings such an original and interesting topic: we are in the middle of a war, a war between Geziri, Daevas and Shafit, a war where all the sides are wrong and have a reason to fight at the same time. It gets frustrating, because the factions are incapable of letting go of their prejudices and hate, but it is also so interesting to read, or at least it is for me. Her characters have depht and you can't help caring for them. Nahri is my absolute favorite, but I love Dara and Ali, too. Plus, we get to read Dara's pov and damn, his chapters were so amazing. I feel for the guy, he's such a misunderstood man. His whole family was brutally murdered, he's been manipulated by the Nahids his entire life, he's been turned into a weapon, a scourge. He just want freedom and peace and I so hope he finds it in the last book, he deserves it. I also loved seeing some non-romantic relationships develop, like Nahri and Jamshid's frienship, and Nahri's strange relationship with Muntadhir. But the romantic side was actually the reason why I took 0.5 off my rating. The romance isn't an important part of this trilogy, but one of the things I appreciated the most in The city of brass was the total absence of a love triangle. Well, I don't know for sure, but it looks like the author wrote the beginning of the dreaded love triangle. Ugh. But anyway, this trilogy is so close to my heart. I'm never going to stop recommending it so if you're a fan of An ember in the ashes, Rebel of the sands and The wrath and the dawn, do yourself a favor and take a chance on these wonderful books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    jia ✨

    I NEED THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW. ARE YOU KIDDING ME? I CAN'T WAIT A YEAR TO READ THIS.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

    Well, shit. That ending was certainly something. Stressful, maddening, intense just to name a few 'somethings'. Seriously though, wtf kind of ending was that??? RTC.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    A lot of sequels in trilogies suffer form what I call "Secondbookitis". This is mostly due to the author setting up for some grand clash or climax in the third book and using the second book to just position characters where they need to be. As you can imagine that leaves the second book without much to do but wait around until the third book starts. Trilogies overall can be excellent but often the second book is the weak link. I am happy to report that The Kingdom of Copper has, in my opinion, a A lot of sequels in trilogies suffer form what I call "Secondbookitis". This is mostly due to the author setting up for some grand clash or climax in the third book and using the second book to just position characters where they need to be. As you can imagine that leaves the second book without much to do but wait around until the third book starts. Trilogies overall can be excellent but often the second book is the weak link. I am happy to report that The Kingdom of Copper has, in my opinion, avoided Secondbookitis. I think this was achieved by letting this book have a pretty darn important conflict at the end that came to fruition. The book had been building up to that conflict as well as developing tensions between various characters that resolved in some really great ways at the end, giving the entire book an identity beyond "facilitator of book three". Instead of setting the table and positioning characters for book three Chakraborty flipped the table over, killed off several key characters, and generally left chaos in her wake. Nothing felt forced or contrived for the characters and their actions were informed by their own experiences and agendas than plot necessities. The story, while clearly building up to a great confrontation at the end, was well paced throughout and was not afraid to do several time jumps to prevent the story from stagnating. All in all this book delivered on character development, building on the story from its predecessor, and making me very excited about how this story will get tied up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rosamund Hodge

    Heart-pounding and heart-wrenching and an utterly perfect sequel.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caylynn Bleess

    ”Are you ready?” Nahri asked when she and Muntadhir were alone. He laughed as he strapped a wicked-looking sword to his waist. “Not in the slightest. You?” “God, no.” Nahri grabbed another needle-sharp dagger and flipped it into her sleeve. “Let’s go die.” I am absolutely fucking speechless right now. Very rarely in my life have I ever enjoyed the sequel of something more than its predecessor. Captain America: Winter Soldier, Percy Jackson and the Battle of the Labyrinth, Gregor and the Curse of ”Are you ready?” Nahri asked when she and Muntadhir were alone. He laughed as he strapped a wicked-looking sword to his waist. “Not in the slightest. You?” “God, no.” Nahri grabbed another needle-sharp dagger and flipped it into her sleeve. “Let’s go die.” I am absolutely fucking speechless right now. Very rarely in my life have I ever enjoyed the sequel of something more than its predecessor. Captain America: Winter Soldier, Percy Jackson and the Battle of the Labyrinth, Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods, Toy Story 2, to name a few… Kingdom of Copper can now be added to that list. Like, I have absolutely no clue where to start with this review. The plot? The shock I felt at the end of the book? The amazing character development that was slightly lacking in City of Brass that is almost overwhelmingly abundant in this one? MY PRECIOUS ALI AND DARA AND NAHRI WHO ALL DESERVED BETTER???? I mean, we go from the little bits of humor towards the beginning of the story, like this scene- ”My cousin apologizes for abusing the hospitality of Bir Nabat,” Ali announced. “He intends to depart at dawn and says we may take a fifth of his inventory to compensate our loss.” Musa whirled on him. “What?” he said hotly in Ntaran. “I certainly did not!” "I will gut you like a fish,” Ali warned in the same tongue before slipping back into Djinnistani: “…to compensate our loss.” To depressing arguments between two betrayed friends like this- ”I saved you.” She let out a high, humorless laugh. “I healed you with my own hands. More than once. And in return you said nothing as we got on that boat, though you knew your father’s men would be waiting. My God, I even offered to let you come with us! You should be proud, Ali. Not many people can outwit me, but you? You had me believing you were my friend until the very end.” Like, Chakraborty is pissing me off with her incredible writing. Since this is the second book in a trilogy, there’s obviously more time spent with the characters and their day to day lives to fill the space before the finale of the third and final book. Most of Kingdom of Copper consists of interactions similar to the one above interspersed with time jumps and small yet devastating action bits. But don’t let that deter you, because almost every page of this book was incredible enough to keep it from falling into the clutches of the horrible “middle book syndrome”. We start the prologue off a few short months after the events of the first book. Ali has been banished to Am Gezeri [the barren desert, technically], Nahri is forcibly married to Ali’s older brother Muntadhir and is working as Daevabad’s resident magical healer, and Dara has been resurrected and is stuck working under a new potential threat to the mystical city and all djinn and Daeva in it. Once the actual story begins, we jump ahead five years to see the progress that has been made amongst the three characters. Ali has been taken in by a small village called Bir Nabat, after finding out that the consequences of his actions at the end of City of Brass are actually beneficial in his current situation. Nahri is trying to make the best out of her situation, after she stumbles upon the ruins of an old hospital that her bloodline used to work from before the uprising 1,500 years ago. And Dara? Poor Dara? He feels like he’s stuck in the same mistakes from his past that he’s being forced to act out all over again. My poor baby. Every time he went through some kind of existential crisis or was forced to do something horrible or something he didn't want to do, I wanted to wrap him up in a blanket and protect his poor soul. What I've cost you? Do you think I want to be here? I do not want any of this! Your family destroyed my life- my honor, my reputation! You had me carry out one of the worst crimes in our history, and when it blew up in your faces, you blamed me! ...You are the one who brought me back. Twice." Tears blurred his eyes. "I was with my sister. I was at peace. Along with the three main characters, we also get to dive into and learn more about other characters like Muntadhir, Jamshid, Nisreen, and a few other brand new characters like the three freed ifrit slaves that Nahri meets in the ruins of the hospital. Jamshid and Razu quickly became two of my favorite characters with their loyalty to Nahri and their independent, stubborn attitudes. I actually had no complaints for this book, which is surprising given how picky I’ve been with stories lately. I just enjoyed every word and was sucked in from the start. I am immensely excited for the last book, even though it is YEARS AWAY. I don’t know how I’ll be able to handle the wait, guys! I can tell that it's going to be mind blowing, and the way that the author has written all of her characters tells me that it'll be a heart-wrenching ending as well.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Merline

    Shannon put her whole foot in this book. Do yourself a favor and treat yo self to this book and these characters and this world. Pre-order this. I need time to write a full review because I'm so emotional right now. my heart is full, but I'm emotional. ahhhhh. I need book 3. I don't know how I'll survive the wait. Update: The long-awaited full review is below. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I was fortunate enough to read an early copy o Shannon put her whole foot in this book. Do yourself a favor and treat yo self to this book and these characters and this world. Pre-order this. I need time to write a full review because I'm so emotional right now. my heart is full, but I'm emotional. ahhhhh. I need book 3. I don't know how I'll survive the wait. Update: The long-awaited full review is below. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I was fortunate enough to read an early copy of my most anticipated book of 2019 in October and it was hands down the best book I read. I devoured this book and even stayed up until 5 a.m. on a work night to finish. I went to work at 8 a.m. with bloodshot eyes and no regrets because it was totally worth it. The Kingdom of Copper surpassed my expectations.It picks up where The City of Brass left off, but takes a step further with a time jump that I totally wasn’t expecting. I promise I read that sentence twice because I was a little surprised (and slightly shook) by the time jump. That’s when I knew Chakraborty did not come to play with us and that she was going to up the stakes and take these characters through things that we weren’t prepared for. This book has everything: magic, intrigue, action, fierce characters, and family drama. It tackles oppression and racism and parallels real modern-day issues. Chakraborty does it all and I marveled in that. So, what did I love about The Kingdom of Copper? Spoiler alert: everything. But if you want specifics…keep reading. I loved the way Chakraborty expanded this world and each of the characters’ arcs. I loved the risks she took with the plot and that she did a much better job balancing the pacing in this book. She doesn’t make things easy for our beloved characters and I honestly wouldn’t have it any other way. • Nahri is still the fierce woman we met in the City of Brass, but she’s changed because of the battle. She doesn’t take shit from the men in her life and she’s not okay with sitting by and letting the her father-in-law run shit. She takes matters into her own hands and she’s basically the Nahri I’ve always loved, but older. She’s also caring and empathetic and driven. I loved her motivation to pursue her dreams despite her circumstance. • Ali is still an adorable and somewhat frustrating nerd. I love him, but he’s too naive and idealistic for me. Just when I think he’s learned from his mistakes, he does the same old shit. That irritated me so damn much because I wish he was more cunning. I really thought the time jump would’ve made him more cynical and on top of his game. Sadly, it didn’t. It’s not a point against the book. It’s just the character making costly decisions and being too much of an idealist. I still love him though. • Dara is…Dara. But different. He’s changed a lot. I wasn’t a fan of that change, but I understand why it was necessary. I don’t like his decisions in this book and I desperately wish he were free from his duty to the Nahids. I know he considers it an honor, but his loyalty to them just breaks my heart. The world-building is exquisite. Daevabad is still beautiful and captivating. I loved the expansion of this world so much. Daevabad feels bigger and larger than life. It literally jumps off the page and I wish I could explore more of it. Long after Chakraborty is done with this series, there will still be more stories to tell in this world. Chakraborty writes good shit. I don’t know how else to put it. The woman is just exceptional at her craft, okay? Her writing is so captivating and it lured me into the story and the world so much that I couldn’t put the book down. It saddened me when I had to physically tear myself away from it for important things like work and sleep and food. Honestly, if I could’ve taken time off just to read it, I would’ve. I truly didn’t want to leave the pages because I was so enthralled and hooked to every word. Plus, I think she nicely balanced mundane character activities with plot and action, which made it so much fun and entertaining. And the twists? They’re so incredible and jaw-dropping. I was literally on the edge of my seat for the last 100 pages. I felt so intoxicated by the action. Overall, the initial review I wrote back in October immediately after I finished it still stands: SHANNON PUT HER FOOT IN THIS BOOK AND EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ THIS. The Kingdom of Copper is phenomenal and it deserves ALL THE STARS. It’s better than The City Brassand I didn’t think that was possible at all. Most series go through a sophomore slump. Not this one though. This was absolutely amazing. Despite the painful ending, my heart was so full. I love these characters and this world so much. I know the last book is going to be ridiculously painful given how things ended, but I’m excited. And slightly afraid. God, I love this book and I wish I could live between the pages. I miss the characters so much and I enjoyed every single moment. Sidenote: I’m kind of peeved with myself for reading it so early though because I haven’t had anyone to talk to about THAT ENDING. I’m so happy it’s out in the world today because I’ll be free from my prison. *whispers* please read it soon and DM me on social media so we can talk about it* If you’re in the mood for middle eastern mythology with a diverse cast of characters, scheming, and djinn magic or if you liked The City of Brass, you’ll enjoy this. Content Warning: violence, racism, oppression, refugee crisis

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Chamberlin

    My favorite book of 2018. I can’t say much about this sequel due to spoilers, but I will say that I felt emotions I’ve never experienced before when reading. I cried. I laughed. I screamed. It brought everything and more. I’m STILL not over it, and it has been over a month. As always, the politics shine through this series starkly and intelligently. Everyone is dancing around each other trying to keep the peace, get their own wishes, and just not die. You really start to see the inner workings of Da My favorite book of 2018. I can’t say much about this sequel due to spoilers, but I will say that I felt emotions I’ve never experienced before when reading. I cried. I laughed. I screamed. It brought everything and more. I’m STILL not over it, and it has been over a month. As always, the politics shine through this series starkly and intelligently. Everyone is dancing around each other trying to keep the peace, get their own wishes, and just not die. You really start to see the inner workings of Daevabad, and it’s phenomenal . Now something that surprised me in TKOC was the familial relationships as well as friendships. You don’t see strong parental-children relationships in books much these days because usually parents are dead, but there’s a few great scenes in TKOC. I started crying a little during some of them. It was heartfelt, and I really appreciated each one of them. Lastly, the sibling dynamic was ON POINT. They were some of my favorite scenes because I thought of my own brother and my own experiences. Like TCOB, the writing was smooth, lyrical, and as always hysterical because Nahri is the funniest narrator. Her sass is like no other. WARNING: Be prepared for allll the feels when reading this story. Be prepared for the ride of a lifetime. Be prepared for a beautiful, politically captivating sequel.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    4 stars - so close to a 5 until the ending. That's it?! The twists weren't difficult to predict, but nonetheless, SAC still gave us an engaging and entertaining read. I still inhale-read 600 pages in less than a week, so it goes to show that Kingdom of Copper held my interest to the end. RTC?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    Well I'm motherfucking broken.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sakina (aforestofbooks)

    Where to begin... First of all, a big thank you to HarperCollins Canada for sending me an arc of The Kingdom of Copper! My very first arc from HarperCollins was for The City of Brass, so I was almost in tears when the second book fell into my hands. This series has stolen my heart since the first book, and I'm so glad I can continue on with this journey! Overall Rating: 5 stars! This book was a whirlwind of a read. I don't think I can fully explain how I feel or what I'm thinking right now. I alrea Where to begin... First of all, a big thank you to HarperCollins Canada for sending me an arc of The Kingdom of Copper! My very first arc from HarperCollins was for The City of Brass, so I was almost in tears when the second book fell into my hands. This series has stolen my heart since the first book, and I'm so glad I can continue on with this journey! Overall Rating: 5 stars! This book was a whirlwind of a read. I don't think I can fully explain how I feel or what I'm thinking right now. I already know that I need to reread, and this time tab certain pages and sections just so I can keep track of everything that happened and the possible implications and all the heart wrenching moments *cue the tears* I'm already sad to be done with this world (for now), and I hurt inside cause I have to wait till 2021 to see how it all ends! (picture of me begging for the third book) THE WRITING & WORLD I can never talk enough about Shannon's writing. It's beautifully delicious–and no, I'm not just talking about the food descriptions. I feel like I can almost taste the world she's created. Everything feels so tangible and real. It's like I'm actually there, tinkering away in the infirmary, making potions and healing salves. I can see myself wandering the palace gardens, or exploring the Daeva Temple, or even just pushing past the waves of djinn in the Grand Bazaar. And it's not just Daevabad. We get to see so much more of this wonderful world! The glimpses of life in Am Gezira through Ali's perspective, the varying settings that take place in Dara's chapters. We get to experience every day life, we get to see culture and how it varies according to each tribe. Shannon's world as a whole feels more fleshed out and bigger in this second book, and I loved every second of it! PLOT, PLOT, PLOT Shannon is just incredible. I was literally sitting in awe at so many points in this book, wishing and hoping that one day I can write something just as good. There are so many little threads that intersect and intertwine perfectly. Everything has a place; a purpose. (I have no idea how she keeps track of all of this, let alone how she came up with any of this.) Add some drama and heartbreak, along with a barrel full of politics and history, and you get a melting pot of amazingness. I mentioned in my review for The City of Brass how the story Shannon tells isn't very black or white. It's hard to pick one side and say "Okay, this side was in the right and I'm rooting for them to win!" There is no "right" side. There is no side that has done less wrong compared to the other. Both the shafit and the daevas have been persecuted and treated terribly. Both sides have made terrible decisions, justified by what they've gone through/are going through. It's all so very complex and deep. And Shannon shows this so well. We get glimpses of the confusion that not just Nahri, but every character in this book goes through, as more and more is revealed about the past. History is full of secrets and half-truths. It's embellished by the people who write it or live it. And there are always two sides to a story. I don't want to get too much more into the plot, cause I do want this review to be mostly non-spoilery. But the entire book felt like I was on a rollercoaster blindfolded. My emotions were a mess. One moment I would be terrified, the next I would be happy. Then a chapter later I would be horrified, and then I would be REALLY SAD. I just never knew what to expect. I was constantly on my toes. There were drops on this rollercoaster that I did not know about, and sharp turns that had me almost falling out of my seat. IT WAS A RIDE PEOPLE. And I enjoyed every second–including the pain and heartbreak. SIDE CHARACTERS If you thought this book would just focus on the main characters, you were wrong. I was wrong. I was not expecting this much. My heart wasn't ready at all. Let's talk about Muntadhir. He is a flawed, complex, character who you want to slap across the face one second and then pat on the head the next and tell him it'll be okay. You might also want to murder him a few times. I came close to murdering him myself. However...Shannon writes his character just as well as she writes the plot itself. It's not as simple as it may seem. We see the pressure that Muntadhir is in, we see how scared he is and how he does his best to hide his weaknesses from a father who would openly exploit them. We see him warring between doing what is right and what is easy. And he chooses easy for a lot of it. And it makes sense. Muntadhir isn't idealistic and brash like Ali. He doesn't act first and think later. He has the self-preservation that Ali doesn't. He believes in living to change the future. Yet, he's too scared to stand up for the wrongs being done in the present. And that's realistic. Not everyone can be a hero. And the pressure and abuse Muntadhir has gone through at the hands of his father, aren't necessarily easy things to shrug off. Ali spent most of his life in the Citadel, away from his father and the life that Muntadhir had to lead. And while Ali resents how Muntadhir got to live in luxury and ease, he doesn't see what his father made his older brother go through. This quote honestly made me cry inside: "And I am well aware of my duties; you've been beating their importance into me since I was a child." Muntadhir does some horribly cruel stuff in this book–that scene near the end almost had me in tears. I wanted to murder him with my own hands. It hurts way more when someone close to you, a family member, does something purposely cruel, knowing how much it'll affect you. But we also see the reverse of it. We see how Ali treats Muntadhir, though a lot of his actions don't have the same forethought as Muntadhir's do, he does hurt him just the same through his lack of self-preservation and thoughtlessness and rash actions. Not to forget the many times Ali openly questioned Muntadhir's authority, not knowing how hard it was for his older brother to get to where he is today. Then we have Zaynab. She wasn't my favourite in The City of Brass because of what she did to Nahri, but in this book I was squealing. She deserves so much more hype honestly. The scene where she takes Nahri off to explore and wander the Geziri district, how she plays along in harem politics, her attempts at trying to save her brothers' relationship, just everything! The scene where she goes to the Temple and single-handedly prevents what would have been a huge altercation between the Daevas and Ali. She has a way with words, and people tend to underestimate her cause she's so beautiful and a princess. I just kind of love her and I'm really hoping we get to see more of her in book three! Lubayd and Aqisa were also some of my favourites. Aqisa is just a badass honestly. I love her sneaking around the palace and into and out of the harem. But Lubayd, ugh, he's a sweetheart. I just see him as a huge cuddly teddy bear who you want to hug. The scenes with him and Aqisa teasing Ali are honestly my favourite. My poor alu prince chose great friends. NAHRI Nahri went through a hell of a lot in this book. One thing I did want to get into was the first scene we get in the prologue. I wasn't expecting a (view spoiler)[wedding night (hide spoiler)] scene and because of that it made the first little bit of the book kind of difficult to read. This is mostly a personal thing, but I just get really uncomfortable about stuff like that. And even though nothing crazy happens, it's the idea of something happening that terrified me. I guess it's one of my worst nightmares, and seeing it on the page, happening to a character I care about, scared me a bit more than I was expecting. (Just thought I'd add a warning for anyone reading this before reading the book) But besides that, we see how she's technically a prisoner in her new home. She can't leave, she doesn't have a say in anything, and other people take the price for her stepping out of line. It's just horrible. I did love seeing her working in the infirmary. She's learned so much since the last book and seeing her admit how much of a joy it is to be healing people like she's always wanted, made me feel all soft inside. Even her relationship with Muntadhir, though tumultuous, had moments that were endearing. Though they were constantly ruined, which explains the rollercoaster of emotions I went through. Also, her realizing that Daevabad will never feel like home to her HURT LIKE HELL. Seeing her reminisce of Egypt and her life before, made me so sad. She honestly just deserves a good, long vacation, with no politics or drama, or people plotting against her. ^^^ DARA My emerald-eyed son was a joy to read about. He had his own POV in this book and I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it. Dara is as complex of a character as Muntadhir. He has done some horrible stuff and he's about to do more for the sake of a "better" future. The realization he comes to, knowing that in the end he isn't doing anything for the better, but only continuing on the cycle from the past, had me nodding my head up and down and crying proud tears inside. He surprised me. Especially near the end. I do worry about how everything will affect his relationship with Nahri. And seeing how broken Dara feels at the end, I'm a bit scared for what book three will bring. ALIZAYD AL QAHTANI AKA PRINCE ALU I am never, ever going to get over the fact that my child, ALIZAYD AL QAHTANI, is an alu. He is an actual potato head. And I love my potato head so much. The next time I have alu salan, I will spend the entire time thinking of PRINCE ALU AND HIS RASH AND STUPID ADVENTURES IN DAEVABAD (as this book should be titled). Also, I found a gif of a wild Prince Alu running away from his sense of self-preservation. Ali gets a nice long rant from me. We see him grow a lot as a character in this book, especially in the beginning. It almost seems that his time away from home was good for his heart and soul. He matured and grew up and then was immediately tossed back into a cesspool and ruined everything. And despite all of that that, I wasn't annoyed the least. Yes, Ali makes stupid decisions. He listens to his heart more than his brain. Or he justifies his heart through his brain, and thinks he's all clever, and then Ghassan stabs him in the chest for fun. IT IS ALL SO MUCH FUN. But we see him grow despite all of that. He does get a bit more careful, but I think his rashness and his mistakes make for a more realistic character. If he got everything right the first time and there were never any repercussions, sure my blood pressure would be back to normal, but who cares about that when you can cry your eyes out and scream at a book. It also goes to show what kind of a man Ghassan really is. Cause honestly, if I were in Ali's situation, I would probably not be making any good decisions either, cause there just aren't any. It's a mess. All of this is a mess. When you take into account the different parties that are involved, the politics, the religious beliefs, the history. None of it is straightforward. No one is telling the truth. Everyone has different plans. People are plotting behind each other's backs. Everyone thinks they know best. It's difficult navigating something like that. Honestly, I would probably be like Muntadhir if I were dropped into this world. I admire Ali for his guts, for his willingness to take the risk, for speaking his mind, and for FIGHTING. Yes, he makes mistakes. He takes drastic actions that come back to bite him, but he does it knowing, just like Nahri realizes near the end, that there are some sacrifices that are worth it. AND I LOVE HIM FOR IT. THE ENDING haha. That ending. So much happened in such a short space of time. It felt like watching a movie in my head, with the scenes changing, showing the different characters and what they're doing, and everything finally fitting together near the end. I read the last 100 pages or so in about two hours, which is really fast for me. And I was terrified the entire time. I will say that a lot of people made it sound like the ending would hurt my soul and that I would shed real tears. I did not cry. I was very concerned and scared though. And my mind was going crazy with questions, so I didn't have time to process anything. But I was happy with where things left off. I have millions of questions, and I haven't even started theorizing (leaving that for my next reread), but to say I'm excited for the next book is not even close to accurate. I can't wait to see how everything ends. I'm scared for my children. Like really scared. I have no idea what is going to happen to them and I just want everyone to be happy. This series is now one of my all time favourites. It is up there with Harry Potter, Tamora Pierce's works, and The Pureblood Pretense (the best HP/TP fanfic ever). Shannon is an inspiration not just for authors, she's an inspiration for Muslims everywhere. To see a book, with people like me, who worship the way I do, who believe in the things I do, who look like me...It's just incredible. Growing up, I never wrote stories where my characters looked or acted like I do. It just didn't seem right, or sound possible. But reading her words, experiencing her story, living in her world, makes me realize it is possible. And I have her to thank for that. For those interested in my reactions to reading The Kingdom of Copper, here's the link to my Twitter thread.

  26. 4 out of 5

    julia ☆ [owls reads]

    #1 The City of Brass: ★★★★★ *

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zehra

    The City of Brass was one of my favorite books last year and one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. S.A. Chakraborty created such a lush and beautiful world, that it is not hard to imagine to get to Daevabad yourself. Of course that would only be a easy life if you have the right blood but that's another story. For the past year I hoped that the second book would not be a huge disapointed. I was afraid because it doesn't mean that if the first book in a trilogy is good, the other two The City of Brass was one of my favorite books last year and one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. S.A. Chakraborty created such a lush and beautiful world, that it is not hard to imagine to get to Daevabad yourself. Of course that would only be a easy life if you have the right blood but that's another story. For the past year I hoped that the second book would not be a huge disapointed. I was afraid because it doesn't mean that if the first book in a trilogy is good, the other two ones follow this path as well. I shouldn't have worried so much because the Kingdom of Copper is just as good as the City of Brass. The world you come back to has not changed. The characters you came to love have not changed. Everything is as you left it. Horrible and oppressed. The Kingdom of Copper is definity a book about revolution, about what will happen if a King abuses his people to hold them in check. But it's not like other YA books about revolution. I don't know how to explain it but it feels more real. As if this really jumped out of a history book and isn't that funny, because that's exactly what happened and none of the parties learned anything. History repeats itself, huh. I think the Kingdom of Copper is one of the most politcal books I have ever read. Like it probably tackles every politcal topic available. The author doesn't just scratch the surface, she honestly digs deep and hard and sometimes it hurts to read but it's really up-to-date and maybe some people would actually learn a thing or two from reading it. The ending shattered me. Where did all these plot twists coming from? Who can I trust? I honestly have no idea and I'm so angry with myself that I have now one year to wait before I'll see Nahri again. (Where are all these time machines, if you need one...)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Who Reads

    4.5 stars I’m obviously not the most experienced at reading or reviewing adult fantasy. But unlike with The City of Brass (which I admit I read somewhat haphazardly), I really put my all into paying attention to The Kingdom of Copper. And you know what? It was so worth it. Even though I remembered basically nothing from book 1 at the beginning of The Kingdom of Copper, somehow I managed to jog my memory as I read the sequel, and it was so subtle I cry at how well Chakraborty brought up book 1 wit 4.5 stars I’m obviously not the most experienced at reading or reviewing adult fantasy. But unlike with The City of Brass (which I admit I read somewhat haphazardly), I really put my all into paying attention to The Kingdom of Copper. And you know what? It was so worth it. Even though I remembered basically nothing from book 1 at the beginning of The Kingdom of Copper, somehow I managed to jog my memory as I read the sequel, and it was so subtle I cry at how well Chakraborty brought up book 1 without info dumping us. That is how you write a sequel, y’all. Especially for the readers who pain themselves by waiting a year to read each book. So besides the fact that Chakraborty seamlessly made us remember everything about this world, she also did just a really good job with this book? It’s not to say that I found it perfect–but I definitely tried my best to read it from an adult fantasy perspective rather than a YA fantasy perspective to keep from being one of those people who go “I’m not the intended audience but this book is dumb.” So I really focused on this and gave my undivided attention to The Kingdom of Copper, and I ended up enjoying it. Of course, it was an adjustment. The writing was denser than I was used to and the politics more complicated and the slow burn even slower and burnier. But despite me not being the intended audience, I was still able to enjoy this a lot. I did find it better than book 1, but that also is probably because I focused way more on reading The Kingdom of Copper and really put my all into this book, which paid off in giving me a better reading experience. The main characters (I won’t mention for the sake of spoiling book 1) all had very distinct storylines and emotions and I really liked how Chakraborty wrote about them in this novel (and how she brought them together at the end). I did feel like something was missing from Nahri’s storyline because I felt like I didn’t get nearly enough layers from her character ARC? She felt a little flat, even though I really enjoyed her in book 1. But everything else was amazing. The worldbuilding was so lush. Sometimes authors really slack in sequels at building the world, but Chakraborty did not disappoint with how she built up the magic and world in The Kingdom of Copper. Sure, we revisited old places, but she also introduced new ones which I really enjoyed. Plus, although the pacing Is definitely a lot slower than what I’m used to in YA, I liked how it gave us that development and buildup that I was looking for and missing in YA–the slow burn both in the romance, and the relationships. It was 600 pages and these aren’t like, big font pages. They’re pretty long, and it did take me a good amount of time to read, but ultimately I found reading The Kingdom of Copper to be worth it and a really good time, now that I gave the series more of my effort. It’s a story that kind of starts out slow, but builds and builds and builds as your read further, until the explosion at the end where you’re left screaming for book 3. And wow, do I want book 3. Overall, I had a great time reading The Kingdom of Copper, and a big part of it was Chakraborty’s incredible writing, but also my own commitment to enjoying this book instead of rushing through. Thank you so much to Mike for sending me an ARC! These are my honest opinions. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  29. 5 out of 5

    Saman

    "There are always people to save. And always cunning men and women around who find a way to take advantage of that duty and harness it into power." Such precious fantasy books are so rare to find and good politics in a fantasy world, even rarer! This book was not perfect in any sense. The history of characters and the world is really confusing and difficult to remember. The first half of the book was dull and went on forever with several descriptions of how dazzling and beautiful everyone looked. "There are always people to save. And always cunning men and women around who find a way to take advantage of that duty and harness it into power." Such precious fantasy books are so rare to find and good politics in a fantasy world, even rarer! This book was not perfect in any sense. The history of characters and the world is really confusing and difficult to remember. The first half of the book was dull and went on forever with several descriptions of how dazzling and beautiful everyone looked. But the way all the events led to the ending is, in simple words, brilliant. And the ending itself was cruel and absolutely unexpected. The author has done great work in expanding the world. The world building and politics in this book is what makes it unique and stand out. I genuinely think that it is one of those books which deserves more attention. As a fantasy book, it has everything; intriguing political plot, battles, intricate world-building, diversity, and cultural representation. I have seen people who DNF it because they are unable to read or pronounce certain words. That's not how you learn about a culture!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    4.5 stars *screams eternally*

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