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Guts

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Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it's probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she's dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina's tummy trouble isn't going away... and it coinci Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it's probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she's dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina's tummy trouble isn't going away... and it coincides with her worries about food, school, and changing friendships. What's going on? Raina Telgemeier once again brings us a thoughtful, charming, and funny true story about growing up and gathering the courage to face -- and conquer -- her fears.


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Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it's probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she's dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina's tummy trouble isn't going away... and it coinci Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it's probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she's dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina's tummy trouble isn't going away... and it coincides with her worries about food, school, and changing friendships. What's going on? Raina Telgemeier once again brings us a thoughtful, charming, and funny true story about growing up and gathering the courage to face -- and conquer -- her fears.

30 review for Guts

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tucker

    [9/17/2019] - TW: Anxiety, throwing up. Review to come! ************ WHAT?!? THE QUEEN OF GRAPHIC NOVELS IS RELEASING ANOTHER BOOK!! | Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Reddit | LinkedIn | YouTube | BookSirens

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Middle-grade book. Raina starts fifth grade. I liked this book, but it doesn't really have much of a plot. Raina starts to struggle with anxiety, panic attacks, having a very sensitive stomach, and dealing with a mean girl at school. She ends up in therapy, which the book sweetly makes clear is not a big deal or something to be ashamed of. There's not a cohesive storyline, and that probably won't bother most people, but for me it makes a book less enjoyable. As usual, Telgemeier makes books with wonderful illustratio Middle-grade book. Raina starts fifth grade. I liked this book, but it doesn't really have much of a plot. Raina starts to struggle with anxiety, panic attacks, having a very sensitive stomach, and dealing with a mean girl at school. She ends up in therapy, which the book sweetly makes clear is not a big deal or something to be ashamed of. There's not a cohesive storyline, and that probably won't bother most people, but for me it makes a book less enjoyable. As usual, Telgemeier makes books with wonderful illustrations that involve realistic kids going through realistic problems (ha ha ha, maybe with the exception of Ghosts). The only reason I struggled with it is because it's not really about anything nor does it have the typical hallmarks of plot. I'd liken it to something like Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret but with less of a cohesive, structured storyline. If you like Telgemeier's other books you will probably enjoy this. NAMES IN THIS BOOK (view spoiler)[ Raina f Nicole f Teddy m Michelle f Will m Amara f Jane f Tai m Andre m Serena f Lauren f Dina f Rosa f Louie m Ann f (hide spoiler)]

  3. 5 out of 5

    Truebluedah ♪

    Goodreads: Raina Telgemeier is releasing a new book! Me: 9/3/19: Y’all, after attending Raina’s Presentation at the NBF, I got a sneak peek. It looks very good and extremely relatable. I’ve request it already and I’m so excited! Two weeks left! :D 9/17/19: I finally read it. Here’s my review.. Let’s all rise for our national anxiety anthem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO4nm... You may be seated. This book was emotional. This book was painfully relatable. This b Goodreads: Raina Telgemeier is releasing a new book! Me: 9/3/19: Y’all, after attending Raina’s Presentation at the NBF, I got a sneak peek. It looks very good and extremely relatable. I’ve request it already and I’m so excited! Two weeks left! :D 9/17/19: I finally read it. Here’s my review.. Let’s all rise for our national anxiety anthem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO4nm... You may be seated. This book was emotional. This book was painfully relatable. This book gave me a stomach ache. And I am ok with that. To say that this book is relatable would be an understatement. In fact, I’m probably gonna bring this book to therapy so I can explain my thoughts without having to come up with the idea myself.. thanks, Raina! 💙 It’s so painful to have to hold in the anxiety and terror that is ibs. I don’t have ibs but I do have constant anxious stomach, was almost diagnosed with ibs before I was diagnosed with lactose intolerance and anxiety. In summer of 2018, I began to suffer form horrible upset stomachs. These terrified me more than anything else ever had. It got to the point where I was scared to eat most days and **TRIGGER WARNING** I ended up in the hospital for a suicide attempt because that’s how bad it got. Unbeknownst to me, I was lactose intolerant. So I kept eating dairy, getting upset stomachs, and getting bad anxiety. Eventually though, I made a full mental recovery. Now I just live my life doing my best to survive through the anxiety that does still exist in my brain. So yeah, that’s my story. Raina’s story was very inspiring and it’s so cool to see her be so brave to share this part of her life. ❤️ Overall, this book was inspiring, relatable and a book everyone should read. 🥑🥑🥑🥑🥑

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    "For anyone who is afraid." Yet another graphic novel for older children/middle grades by rock star graphic novelist Raina Telgemeier, and this one is maybe her most serious and personal, dealing with her lifelong (and continuing!) anxiety, phobias and panic attacks connected to her digestive system. A doctor diagnosed her as having irritable bowel syndrome, so she has some real sensitivities but they are exacerbated by stress. Though it is intended to connect to others who have simil "For anyone who is afraid." Yet another graphic novel for older children/middle grades by rock star graphic novelist Raina Telgemeier, and this one is maybe her most serious and personal, dealing with her lifelong (and continuing!) anxiety, phobias and panic attacks connected to her digestive system. A doctor diagnosed her as having irritable bowel syndrome, so she has some real sensitivities but they are exacerbated by stress. Though it is intended to connect to others who have similar problems, this book made me uncomfortable and a little anxious throughout, since for many early years of my life I had stomach issues related in part to anxiety, partly genetic. For years in my twenties I suffered from colitis as did several other family members. I also had panic attacks for about one year of my life in my late thirties when I was in grad school. Just that year, thank goodness. And now I am teaching a course on the teaching of writing, in the middle of a unit on writing visual essays, inviting them to write on any topic they want and more than a third of the class is writing about mental health issue, anxiety, depression. I am seeing a kind of epidemic of anxiety/stress/depression and so on in classrooms everywhere, which means life everywhere, way worse than when I began teaching decades ago. Here's an article on Raina and the crisis in anxiety in kids: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/17/bo...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I love Raina's books and this is another entry in the Smile series. Raina has a special gift for graphic novels. It is also the first story I have seen for younger kids bout IBS. I tell you, Raina dealt with some tough stuff. She had some severe dental work to contend with and she has had to figure out how to live with IBS. She also shares them so beautifully with us. My niece is going to read this next now that I'm done. She loves the other 2 smile books. She can have stomach issues, I love Raina's books and this is another entry in the Smile series. Raina has a special gift for graphic novels. It is also the first story I have seen for younger kids bout IBS. I tell you, Raina dealt with some tough stuff. She had some severe dental work to contend with and she has had to figure out how to live with IBS. She also shares them so beautifully with us. My niece is going to read this next now that I'm done. She loves the other 2 smile books. She can have stomach issues, so I hope this can show her it's nothing to be worried about. I love the comic feel of the story and all the color. These are great middle grade books. Raina is queen of this age range. Enjoy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tova

    I'm "DNFing" this book because I read a sample, and as much this sounds like it would be hella relatable, I honestly think it would be incredibly triggering, and I don't need that in my life. I have severe emetophobia, and chronic stomach pain, and I don't need more anxiety. Perhaps at some point, I will actually read it, but not right now. --- Do you ever feel like someone is writing about your life? As someone with chronic stomach pain, this sounds painfully relatable.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Karissa Fast

    Thank you to Scholastic for the Advanced Reading Copy. This review contains spoilers, and is written from the perspective of a children's librarian. It's been 5 years since Sisters, the sequel to Smile, was published. From my experience working in libraries, interest in the series has only increased over time. When I visit grades 4 - 6 and ask if anyone has read the Smile series, almost every hand goes up - boys included! For that reason alone, the 3rd book in the series is a must pur Thank you to Scholastic for the Advanced Reading Copy. This review contains spoilers, and is written from the perspective of a children's librarian. It's been 5 years since Sisters, the sequel to Smile, was published. From my experience working in libraries, interest in the series has only increased over time. When I visit grades 4 - 6 and ask if anyone has read the Smile series, almost every hand goes up - boys included! For that reason alone, the 3rd book in the series is a must purchase for public and school libraries. Beyond that, Guts is phenomenal. The best book in the series thus far. The pacing, dialogue, humor, and subject matter shows that Raina Telegemeier is truly a master graphic novelist at the top of her game. As with Smile and Sisters, Guts is based on elements of Raina's middle grade life. Where Smile is about Raina's insecurities about her braces, and Sisters is about her difficult relationship with her sister, Guts is about her anxiety. At first Raina develops a phobia of throwing up. She experiences a panic attack at the thought of getting sick. While the feeling is difficult to explain in words, Raina does an apt job communicating the feeling through images of the character falling through the bathroom floor while struggling to stay above. Her anxieties expand to include social situations and eating. Eventually her parents have her see a therapist. I found the therapy scenes to be especially well done and realistic. Raina is anxious about therapy, but her therapist is patient and understanding, often encouraging her to just "try," even when the words don't come easily. In the end Raina receives a diagnosis related to her upset stomach, and learns coping mechanisms for her anxiety. The book also depicts a tense friendship between Raina and another girl in her class. Both girls feel that the other is unfairly unkind to them, but are able to open up and realize that they aren't so different after all. Readers of all ages will take away real mindfulness practices such as grounding and deep breathing. The book will help destigmatize mental health issues and going to therapy. I appreciate Raina telling her story with such honesty and using her platform to help children understand how to get help. This book is easily readable in one sitting, and I can imagine many children will do just that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The #1 Bestselling Book in America the week it debuted hardly needs my endorsement, but Imma give it to you anyway: Read Raina's books. Guts, like Smile and Sisters, was a damn delight. I love the way she draws, I love the frank and funny way she tells the story of her childhood. Smile focused on the drama when she smashed her front teeth, but also dipped into the rest of what was happening in her life. Sisters was the tale of a road trip, but also about her life and her relationship with her si The #1 Bestselling Book in America the week it debuted hardly needs my endorsement, but Imma give it to you anyway: Read Raina's books. Guts, like Smile and Sisters, was a damn delight. I love the way she draws, I love the frank and funny way she tells the story of her childhood. Smile focused on the drama when she smashed her front teeth, but also dipped into the rest of what was happening in her life. Sisters was the tale of a road trip, but also about her life and her relationship with her sister, and now we have Guts, a book that I wish that I, personally, had had as a kid. Not only do I have IBS, and have had stomach aches and "nervous stomach" since childhood, but while I don't have anxiety, I do have depression, and I wish I had had books like this as a kid to show me that I was not alone, not a freak, and not about to die! Raina's the 21st century Judy Blume, explaining Life to kids, just with less talk about giant maxi pads or bras.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Absolutely amazing and brave of Raina to share her story to help others who might be going through the same thing. Highly recommended for children who are anxious and nervous. They may benefit from this book. 5 stars, all the way!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen Cline

    Read in one sitting. Raina can do no wrong. I personally feel this is her best yet.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Albeit that I have once again and certainly noticed author and illustrator Raina Telgemeier’s childhood very much reflected in my own past and innermost soul, I also do have to admit that Guts has in fact been so extremely close to my own personal experiences with both anxiety and IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) that much of Telgemeier’s text (as well as of course her accompanying artwork) have felt rather personally uncomfortable and thus also not always all that enjoyable and pleasant a reading exp Albeit that I have once again and certainly noticed author and illustrator Raina Telgemeier’s childhood very much reflected in my own past and innermost soul, I also do have to admit that Guts has in fact been so extremely close to my own personal experiences with both anxiety and IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) that much of Telgemeier’s text (as well as of course her accompanying artwork) have felt rather personally uncomfortable and thus also not always all that enjoyable and pleasant a reading experience (and this in particular since I also was and remain rather envious of the fact that Raina’s parents obviously repeatedly took her to both the doctor and then to therapy, whilst my parents tended to usually just scoff at my anxieties and tell me to suck things up and not to make such a fuss). Still Guts does indeed and thankfully present an important message that school, that childhood can be horribly stressful and that we should also not be so closed and secretive about telling our friends and our families about our problems, that the stigma of having to go to therapy, that having anxiety and a sensitive stomach should not really ever be such a big and huge deal (and which I do think Raina Telgemeier successfully shows with Guts, especially since this is her own story, her own childhood issues with IBS and general anxiety, although truth be told, I actually have found the author’s note even better than the main textual and illustrative body of Guts). Four stars for what Guts has achieved (for showing Raina Telgemeier’s anxiety and stomach issues clearly and with a strong lesson that anxiety, medical issues etc. should not face so much scrutiny, secrecy and stigma) but I am going to lower my rating to three stars because to and for me, in particular how Michelle and Raina end up burying their hatchet and become if not friends then at least no longer enemies has felt more than a bit rushed and should have (in my humble opinion) been given a considerably longer textual treatment.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    If you follow my reviews at all you know by now that I'm a HUGE fan of almost anything that makes the effort, especially for young readers, to normalize things that have historically been hidden or discussed in hushed tones or labeled "not something we talk about." I think we need to begin stepping away from keeping things like mental health issues and addiction anonymous and the sooner we can do it with our kids the better off we're all going to be. I, and god knows how many other pe If you follow my reviews at all you know by now that I'm a HUGE fan of almost anything that makes the effort, especially for young readers, to normalize things that have historically been hidden or discussed in hushed tones or labeled "not something we talk about." I think we need to begin stepping away from keeping things like mental health issues and addiction anonymous and the sooner we can do it with our kids the better off we're all going to be. I, and god knows how many other people, struggled for years and years with crippling anxiety and depression. It affected, quite literally, every single part of my life. I didn't even know how bad it was until it started getting better. And without a doubt two of the biggest roadblocks in my recovery were feeling like this was something "wrong" about myself that I needed to hide and a firm belief that I should be able to get things under control myself. Which ironically made everything infinitely worse. So thank Christ for books like this is what I'm saying! This fantastic, semi-autobiographical graphic novel should be mandatory reading for practically every kid in the world which is basically true of all Raina's wonderful books but this one is especially important. Because it puts anxiety in a place that any kid can relate to. Firmly in the bathroom. Grade school aged Raina wakes up one night with a stomachache. At first it seems like just the same run of the mill flu everyone in school has but it starts Raina's brain tumbling into total chaos. What if she throws up in school? Should she eat that chip her friend is offering her? Did they wash their hands? What if that food makes her sick? What if someone else throws up? Before long she's developed a phobia about food and throwing up to the point where she's missing school and literally making herself sick. Fortunately her parents get her to an understanding therapist who helps Raina start to get a handle on the actual things in her life that are causing her stress and anxiety and giving her a safe place to talk about them. While its a very common manifestation of anxiety Raina's chosen like the perfect way to show younger readers what anxiety actually looks like. She even sets the story up with a reminder of how funny kids find bathroom stuff. The entire intro is devoted to Raina and her friends delighting in all things disgusting; farts, and scabs, and vomit. It makes it all the sadder when Raina loses that sort of innocent fascination and sense of icky fun and has it replaced instead with fear. Raina also wisely stays away from portraying herself as a perfect, put upon victim. She's mouthy and obnoxious and kinda mean sometimes because dealing with mental health issues doesn't preclude you from being a jerk. I also like that's there's no simple fix here. She doesn't figure it all out or immediately get a handle on stuff. Self care and dealing with mental health are long term, often life term commitments. Taking care of yourself is hard work! Most importantly the book is incredibly optimistic and positive about dealing with anxiety something that, in my opinion, is possibly the most important thing to be telling young kids dealing with it. It encourages its readers to turn to the people who care about them for help and not to feel ashamed of what they're going through. There's a wonderful moment at the end of the book where Raina, now more comfortable with her issues, admits to what she's been struggling with at a sleepover with her girlfriends. To her surprise, one by one, they all reveal some of their own "secrets" and with a mix of shock and happiness Raina actually sees for herself that she's far from the only person dealing with something that scares or upsets her. There's going to be many times in a child's life when they'll need reminding that they're not alone in the daily struggle of just being alive. This is a great book to hand them when that happens.

  13. 4 out of 5

    laurel [suspected bibliophile]

    Raina enters fifth grade—and starts to get weird stomachaches. Nothing is wrong, but she feels awful! I really enjoyed this graphic novel, which aptly talks about anxiety and all of the wealth of health issues that having a lot of stress and anxiety can produce on your body—and how your mind can latch onto things and run with it, particularly in the tumultuous time that is fifth grade and puberty. Raina is an incredibly relatable protagonist, with fears of not fitting in, o Raina enters fifth grade—and starts to get weird stomachaches. Nothing is wrong, but she feels awful! I really enjoyed this graphic novel, which aptly talks about anxiety and all of the wealth of health issues that having a lot of stress and anxiety can produce on your body—and how your mind can latch onto things and run with it, particularly in the tumultuous time that is fifth grade and puberty. Raina is an incredibly relatable protagonist, with fears of not fitting in, of over-reacting, of being bullied but being disciplined for reacting to the bully, of her stomach and of vomiting. She doesn't overcome them, but she does learn tools to help her navigate her body and her world (and to mitigate spirals) with therapy and supportive parents. Definitely a must-read for children who are worried about worrying—and about their changing friend groups.

  14. 4 out of 5

    TheYALibrarian

    Rating 5 Stars I adore these graphic novels by Raina. It's like a glimpse into my own life as a kid. I know so well what it is like to suffer from crippling anxiety. How it can get so bad that it causes stomach aches and the fear of throwing up. Standing in front of the class can cause that kind of reaction too for young Raina and for me. It's really weird how much I relate to this graphic novel. How having these problems (on top of the depression) has led me to going to therapy for years. Ho Rating 5 Stars I adore these graphic novels by Raina. It's like a glimpse into my own life as a kid. I know so well what it is like to suffer from crippling anxiety. How it can get so bad that it causes stomach aches and the fear of throwing up. Standing in front of the class can cause that kind of reaction too for young Raina and for me. It's really weird how much I relate to this graphic novel. How having these problems (on top of the depression) has led me to going to therapy for years. How it affected school and everything around me. It's not pleasant memories to go back to but it did help reading a comic on someone who went through the same thing. Also Raina's art style is just adorable and I love it every time. I can't wait for more and I'm sure I'll love it as much as Smile and Sisters too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    This graphic memoir is targeted for middle grade/ young adult readers and explores the author's issues with anxiety, panic attacks, and phobias. I appreciate that mental health has started to come out of the closet, and that people are more comfortable talking about it. There is much work to be done here on a variety of fronts, but talking about ways to address and help kids deal with some of these issues head on can only be a good thing. As always the art is cute and colorful, and in this insta This graphic memoir is targeted for middle grade/ young adult readers and explores the author's issues with anxiety, panic attacks, and phobias. I appreciate that mental health has started to come out of the closet, and that people are more comfortable talking about it. There is much work to be done here on a variety of fronts, but talking about ways to address and help kids deal with some of these issues head on can only be a good thing. As always the art is cute and colorful, and in this installment the author does a deeper, more personal dive into these topics, without dumbing things down for kids. This is my fave of her works.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Teut

    My childhood anxiety manifested itself in severe migraines, often accompanied by vomiting. I would get so anxious/nervous/excited about things when I was young, that I would often have to miss out because I had such a strong migraine and was vomiting. (Field trips to the circus and fire station; Christmas caroling with families, etc.) Raina shares how her anxiety manifested itself. I "grew out" of my migraines, but it wasn't until college when I began seeing a therapist and was properly medicate My childhood anxiety manifested itself in severe migraines, often accompanied by vomiting. I would get so anxious/nervous/excited about things when I was young, that I would often have to miss out because I had such a strong migraine and was vomiting. (Field trips to the circus and fire station; Christmas caroling with families, etc.) Raina shares how her anxiety manifested itself. I "grew out" of my migraines, but it wasn't until college when I began seeing a therapist and was properly medicated. I wish I had this book growing up, and I am glad students will have it today, to encourage them to persevere, be resilient, and get help if you need it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Telgemeier shares her struggles with anxieties and phobias and their effect on her digestive system. The book contains a great message for kids even if it isn't Telgemeier's most captivating work. I admit I may be holding this book at a little distance as I have people in my life who struggle with similar problems.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Crowinator

    I loved this book and could have really used it when I was a kid. I was this kid, only I didn't tell anyone about my anxiety, nausea, and emetophobia, and I had no idea therapy existed for such problems. I manage well now, but even when I was a college student, I made sure to sit in the aisle seat in case I had to run out unexpectedly, at movies, at restaurants, at class; I avoided airplanes and buses where I would be trapped without an escape if I was sick; and I never talked about it to anybody. I loved this book and could have really used it when I was a kid. I was this kid, only I didn't tell anyone about my anxiety, nausea, and emetophobia, and I had no idea therapy existed for such problems. I manage well now, but even when I was a college student, I made sure to sit in the aisle seat in case I had to run out unexpectedly, at movies, at restaurants, at class; I avoided airplanes and buses where I would be trapped without an escape if I was sick; and I never talked about it to anybody. Ever. Because I thought it was just me being high-strung. Anyway, aside from validating my childhood experience, this book is also typical Telgemeier: funny, authentic, reassuring, and all-around perfectly pitched for the middle school crowd (as well as the lingering middle-school kid lurking in all of us Olds). The artwork and character designs are so expressive, she can covey so much without words. This might be my favorite one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Fetters

    Raina is back and this is has become my absolute favorite of hers. She shares all the details of one of the personal problems that she had faced as a young adult. It’s heartfelt and compassionate with her own twist of humor thrown in. It’s time to face fear head on and conquer it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kiera

    Loved this book. You can find my full review on my blog

  21. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    it was a really good book. It was a very quick read for me. I connect to the story a few times and I could relate. It also had a good life lesson. I would recommend this book to anyone who liked the books smile, sisters , Drama, ghost and graphic novels. I also recommend this book to anyone who would like a quick good read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Copy provided by the publisher In this third graphic novel memoir, popular author Telgemeier recounts the difficulties she faced in fourth and fifth grade. Living in a small apartment with her parents and younger sister and brother, her family often passed around stomach flu. Combined with the anxiety she felt at school, this morphed into a fear of certain foods, and a terror about vomiting. She often would have an upset stomach, which caused her to miss a lot of school. The doc Copy provided by the publisher In this third graphic novel memoir, popular author Telgemeier recounts the difficulties she faced in fourth and fifth grade. Living in a small apartment with her parents and younger sister and brother, her family often passed around stomach flu. Combined with the anxiety she felt at school, this morphed into a fear of certain foods, and a terror about vomiting. She often would have an upset stomach, which caused her to miss a lot of school. The doctors could never find any physical ailment, so eventually her parents sent her to a therapist, who helped her with her anxiety. Late elementary school has a lot of friend drama, and Raina had to deal with the impending move of her best friend, as well as a mean girl. Therapy helped her learn some coping mechanisms that made it possible for her to get through school and even make some supportive friends. Strengths: There are not many books that deal with children participating in therapy (Gerber's Focused being the most recent exception), and with the growing number of children with anxiety issues, this is a needed topic. It is good to see that there were supportive adults in Telgemeier's life who got her the help she needed; perhaps readers who aren't getting this help will be able to use this book as a springboard for conversations with their own family. Weaknesses: If this were a fiction book, I would have wanted more of a plot (in Gerber's book, the main character was also involved in a chess competition), but since it's a memoir, it's not technically needed. What I really think: I will definitely have to purchase several copies, but this is not my cup of tea. It does show the power of attractive illustrations to sell a story that would be hard to push if it were straight narrative fiction!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Queen_ Awesome

    How do you read the book

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I reread Smile and Sisters in anticipation of this book, and while I enjoyed revisiting them, I needn't have bothered, because it's not a sequel, as I'd hoped, but takes us back in time to Raina age 10, pre-dental drama. It's a super quick read, but definitely not my favorite of the three. Stomach upsets and graphic novels are not a match made in heaven -- there are some things I'd rather not see.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Much like Best Friends this.graphic novel gives a glimpse into Telgemeier's life as a young person. She does a good job describing her experience with anxiety and therapy as a child. I definitely enjoyed this book, and I'm glad I got to share it with my daughters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

    I've been looking forward to reading this book for a long time now and it is absolutely amazing! This book is funny and interesting and I felt like I could really connect with the author and some of her experiences. I got Guts last night and read through it really quickly, and then I read it again this morning! I'll probably read it again before I return it to the library :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    The only reason I'm giving GUTS 4 stars instead of 5 is because I wanted it to be longer. Not because it felt incomplete, but because I saw so much of myself in Raina's story and I had someone to commiserate with. I think this will be an important book for kids and adults to talk openly about mental health struggles, particularly anxiety, and will help to normalize going to therapy. My favorite line from the book was when Raina is in a therapy session and struggling to find the words to explain The only reason I'm giving GUTS 4 stars instead of 5 is because I wanted it to be longer. Not because it felt incomplete, but because I saw so much of myself in Raina's story and I had someone to commiserate with. I think this will be an important book for kids and adults to talk openly about mental health struggles, particularly anxiety, and will help to normalize going to therapy. My favorite line from the book was when Raina is in a therapy session and struggling to find the words to explain how she feels: "Thoughts can exist... Feelings can exist... But words do not always exist." Finding the words for your thoughts and feelings is exactly why there should be no shame in going to therapy. To be able to name a feeling is so freeing. I'm grateful that a book like this will exist for kids to help give words to their thoughts and feelings.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    Hooray for artists and authors who are willing to be real, honest, and vulnerable, especially with young readers. Telgemeier's colorful and expressive illustrative style compliment her experiences, making her storytelling fun, relatable, and accessible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tara Strosnider

    As someone that has anxiety and a panic attacks. I can relate to this and it explains it so well. There always needs to be more books that explains it and that it's part of who you are My story I first started having anxiety and depression when two girls who were my friends then they bullied me I had panic attacks at school they bullied me for my whole junior year of high school where I was scared to going to school scared because I went to a small school so I always saw them and they bullied me As someone that has anxiety and a panic attacks. I can relate to this and it explains it so well. There always needs to be more books that explains it and that it's part of who you are My story I first started having anxiety and depression when two girls who were my friends then they bullied me I had panic attacks at school they bullied me for my whole junior year of high school where I was scared to going to school scared because I went to a small school so I always saw them and they bullied me for my looks my crooked teeth my problems days where I wouldn't go to school scared because of them being there. They tried to get people that were my friends not to be my friends trying to get everyone to turn against me. Thank goodness I had a few friends and teachers that had my back.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    It was a pretty great book I really liked it!

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