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White Bird

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A Wonder story. In R. J. Palacio's collection of stories Auggie & Me, which expands on characters in Wonder, readers were introduced to Julian's grandmother, Grandmère. This is Grandmère's story as a young Jewish girl hidden away by a family in Nazi-occupied France during World War II told in graphic novel form.


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A Wonder story. In R. J. Palacio's collection of stories Auggie & Me, which expands on characters in Wonder, readers were introduced to Julian's grandmother, Grandmère. This is Grandmère's story as a young Jewish girl hidden away by a family in Nazi-occupied France during World War II told in graphic novel form.

30 review for White Bird

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    Wow! I borrowed this today from the library. I was going to concurrently read it with the other two library books I have at home and other reading material too. I had three phone calls I meant to make today. I picked up the book to start it, and I didn’t put it down until I finished it. I did not expect that. This is a Wonder story. I’d wanted more information about Julian and this book provides it. I love Holocaust stories and often enjoy graphic novels so when a GR friend recommended this book Wow! I borrowed this today from the library. I was going to concurrently read it with the other two library books I have at home and other reading material too. I had three phone calls I meant to make today. I picked up the book to start it, and I didn’t put it down until I finished it. I did not expect that. This is a Wonder story. I’d wanted more information about Julian and this book provides it. I love Holocaust stories and often enjoy graphic novels so when a GR friend recommended this book I was eager to read it. This is a wonderfully done book. It’s fabulous. The story is amazingly great and the art is perfect. This author is also an accomplished artist. I was near tears during much of it. I read it easily in one reading session, including the 14 pages of non-fiction extras of text & photos at the end of the book. (I did note 2 minor(?) factual errors about Anne Frank and family. They were not in one tiny room and Anne’s mother never made it to Bergen-Belsen, but the gist of Holocaust details given is good enough!) At the end of the graphic book proper I appreciated the tie in to the current refugee crisis. The people and situations seemed so real I kept forgetting that this was historical fiction and not biography/non-fiction. I’ve read other 2019 graphic books this year. Two are nominated for the Goodreads Choice Awards. I just checked and this one isn’t there, or didn’t get to the semi-finals. That’s a shame. I’d happily voted for another and a third book I liked is also nominated. This one should be on the list too. It’s superbly done. This book is powerful, meaningful, relevant, and entertaining too. For me it was nearly flawless. It’s one of the best graphic books and one of the best Holocaust books I’ve read. The first paragraph of this review would probably have sufficed. I. Could. NOT. Put. It. Down! Highly, highly recommended. Lowest appropriate age for this book is a subjective decision. The friend who recommended it to me says for 9-year olds. I say 11 and up. The author probably says 8-12 as it is a book written for children. ETA: I guess I'm wrong. Kids 9 and up seem to love this book. It's a great book with a great message so I guess that is a good thing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelley Kowalczik

    This would have been 5 stars if it wasn’t for the political propaganda at the end. So disappointed that she did this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Georgia

    I got the arc of this at the ALA conference, and it was amazing! The story was so sad, but it was really really good. In fact, I was so desperate for it not to end that I read all the way into the authors note and the research, which was very interesting. I especially appreciated the tie in to today, which was very important and moving.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This book expands upon Julian's story in Auggie & Me. It is a visually verbal history of Grandmere's history, of growing up during the holocaust & meeting Julian's namesake. Very touching & includes important historical insight. Additionally, there is an afterword, author's note, a note about the dedication, in-depth glossary with photos, a suggested reading list, list of organizations and resources, bibliography and image credits that will be a great and valuable resource for studen This book expands upon Julian's story in Auggie & Me. It is a visually verbal history of Grandmere's history, of growing up during the holocaust & meeting Julian's namesake. Very touching & includes important historical insight. Additionally, there is an afterword, author's note, a note about the dedication, in-depth glossary with photos, a suggested reading list, list of organizations and resources, bibliography and image credits that will be a great and valuable resource for students and other readers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate Willis

    Oh my word. I am not okay. I need this now. <3

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Waring

    This exceptional graphic novel was written by R.J. Palacio, author of Wonder and Auggie & Me. Palacio begins the novel with Julian, a character from Wonder, video-calling his Grandmere to learn about the Holocaust for a school assignment. We see a different side to Julian, who has started a new school year with some regrets about his prior behaviour. Julian’s grandmother agrees to tell him everything in the hope that the future generation will not repeat past mistakes. Julian is moved by his This exceptional graphic novel was written by R.J. Palacio, author of Wonder and Auggie & Me. Palacio begins the novel with Julian, a character from Wonder, video-calling his Grandmere to learn about the Holocaust for a school assignment. We see a different side to Julian, who has started a new school year with some regrets about his prior behaviour. Julian’s grandmother agrees to tell him everything in the hope that the future generation will not repeat past mistakes. Julian is moved by his Grandmere’s story that is equal parts survival and suffering. The emotional depth of the story is breathtaking, and Palacio artfully grabs the reader’s heart without going into traumatising physical detail. If you are looking for a story of concentration camps and death marches, you will not get it here. If you are looking for a story about bystanders, regrets, standing up for change and the beauty of human relationships in the midst of such atrocity, then this is the novel for you. Middle grade readers will learn a lot about history and being a good human from this beautiful graphic novel. There is a poignant link to current political events towards the end of the novel, which readers will (hopefully) reflect on carefully too. Kudos to Palacio for creating yet another powerful story, this time in a completely different medium. This novel would be perfect for all readers but is particularly worth considering for struggling and resistant readers, as it really packs a punch with an economy of words. In the alternative, it would make an engaging extension or companion text for students studying novels such as Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, The Wrong Boy, The Girl in the Blue Coat, The War that Saved My Life, Once (to name a few).

  7. 5 out of 5

    RYANNE

    This book was so good I would recommend this to anybody. However, you should read the Julian chapter of Auggie and Me before you read it because the book will not make sense, and you will be very confused.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paige A

    I loved this book! It was so full of action and so meaningful. I definitely recommend this book to anyone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Max Yeshnowski

    This was a really good book. But at the end when the author compared the holocaust to trump and immigration it made me decide to give this book a four star rating.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Zavala

    This is my first ever graphic novel, so I don't really know how to rate the graphic portion. However, the story is perfect. It made me tear up at the end. My two boys (ages 13 and 11) will be reading this book! I think it should be required reading for all middle-schoolers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I loved everything about this graphic novel....it was a fabulous story of World War 2 and the story of the narrator’s Grandmother. It was delicately told and heart-wrenching. It seemed to be ending well until it became clear the political agenda was strong and had to be thrown in at the end. Ugh - that was disappointing. It was a strong story, all on its own, without having to throw in an agenda. But the story was good and it’s always good to remind us to focus on kindness.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    R.J. Palacio is SUCH a rock star! Not only has she written a completely different style of book in this graphic novel, but she has also wrecked my emotions again! We received our ARC from a very dear friend who knew this book would quickly be in the hands of the kids in our middle/high school. My daughter, a fifth grader, devoured the book and couldn’t wait for me to read it because she was dying to talk to someone about the story. Congratulations, R.J. Palacio, for changing our level of empathy R.J. Palacio is SUCH a rock star! Not only has she written a completely different style of book in this graphic novel, but she has also wrecked my emotions again! We received our ARC from a very dear friend who knew this book would quickly be in the hands of the kids in our middle/high school. My daughter, a fifth grader, devoured the book and couldn’t wait for me to read it because she was dying to talk to someone about the story. Congratulations, R.J. Palacio, for changing our level of empathy and our lives forever once again! This story deserves to be read by ALL, young and old.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amber K.

    Loved it... full review to come. I need time to process this story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Froese

    The graphic novel format allows the depth of the realities of Hitler's Nazi Germany to be exposed via pictures and text. Auggie's bully from Wonder is given depth through the story of his Grandmere's experience and loss as a young Jewish girl in Vichy France during World War II. The afterword, author's note, glossary, suggested readings and resources for further study, make it a credible source for further learning. The grandson FaceTiming with his Grandmere grounds the relevance of the story in The graphic novel format allows the depth of the realities of Hitler's Nazi Germany to be exposed via pictures and text. Auggie's bully from Wonder is given depth through the story of his Grandmere's experience and loss as a young Jewish girl in Vichy France during World War II. The afterword, author's note, glossary, suggested readings and resources for further study, make it a credible source for further learning. The grandson FaceTiming with his Grandmere grounds the relevance of the story in the present.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carli

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5. I listened to this so I cannot speak to the print version (it’s a graphic novel!) but WOW. This book takes Julian from Wonder’s Grandmere and details her story as a young Jewish girl in France during World War II. She is separated from her parents and hidden by the family of a classmate. The narrator is fabulous and I didn’t want the story to end. Invest in the audio as well as the print version, library friends! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5. I listened to this so I cannot speak to the print version (it’s a graphic novel!) but WOW. This book takes Julian from Wonder’s Grandmere and details her story as a young Jewish girl in France during World War II. She is separated from her parents and hidden by the family of a classmate. The narrator is fabulous and I didn’t want the story to end. Invest in the audio as well as the print version, library friends!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay H

    This was my very first graphic novel! RJ Palacio did an amazing job bringing history to life through this masterpiece. Although it was a bit violent, it was true to the times of the Holocaust, and refreshingly honest. I love the way she brought it full-circle to the times we are facing today in the world. I recommend this book to anyone ages 12+.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emma L.

    Rtc Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 (5/5 stars). Brb busy crying right now. This is literally the second graphic novel that has made me cry and you bet I'm going to read wonder now too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    I don't want to say I cried in the break room at work, but I definitely averted my eyes from my coworkers in shame. There's really no shame in crying at this, though. It was so beautifully done it could have only come from the author of Wonder. The artwork and dialogue were simple, and the storytelling and delivery were perfect at illustrating the incredible depth of suffering during the Holocaust without being too graphic for young readers. Absolutely recommend this to all readers, young and old I don't want to say I cried in the break room at work, but I definitely averted my eyes from my coworkers in shame. There's really no shame in crying at this, though. It was so beautifully done it could have only come from the author of Wonder. The artwork and dialogue were simple, and the storytelling and delivery were perfect at illustrating the incredible depth of suffering during the Holocaust without being too graphic for young readers. Absolutely recommend this to all readers, young and old alike.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Celia

    Cut out the last 8 pages and this is a 5 star middle grade graphic novel. That's what I'll be doing when I share it with my nieces and nephews some day. The illegal immigration issue in the United States is not in any way similar to the Holocaust. That someone could draw that comparison boggles my mind and dishonors the sacrifices and deaths of millions of Jews and those who helped them. When people break the law of a country, they cannot expect that country to welcome them Cut out the last 8 pages and this is a 5 star middle grade graphic novel. That's what I'll be doing when I share it with my nieces and nephews some day. The illegal immigration issue in the United States is not in any way similar to the Holocaust. That someone could draw that comparison boggles my mind and dishonors the sacrifices and deaths of millions of Jews and those who helped them. When people break the law of a country, they cannot expect that country to welcome them with open arms or to look the other way--whether they are citizens or not! Unfortunately, American policies on immigration were not enforced so there are thousands of people who illegally built a life here. It may look like the government is the bad guy in this situation, but the bad guy is the guy who breaks the law. And immigrating illegally is, by definition, breaking the law. The United States of America does not have the responsibility or resources to host the entire world. We welcome those we can. But to improve the lives of millions and billions more, the governments of the countries people are fleeing need to change. And that change will be brought about best from the inside. Don't be so arrogant as to assume that the United States is meant to be the savior of the world. That position is already taken.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sue Seligman

    An excellent graphic novel by the author of Wonder, the ground breaking story of middle school challenges such as bullying, trying to fit in, peer pressure, etc. White Bird is the story of Julian’s French grandmother, a survivor of the Holocaust. The novel opens as Julian, the boy who bullied the main character in Wonder, interviews his grandmother via Face Time, for a school project. We learn that Julian is attending a new school and has regrets about his previous behavior. His grandmother relu An excellent graphic novel by the author of Wonder, the ground breaking story of middle school challenges such as bullying, trying to fit in, peer pressure, etc. White Bird is the story of Julian’s French grandmother, a survivor of the Holocaust. The novel opens as Julian, the boy who bullied the main character in Wonder, interviews his grandmother via Face Time, for a school project. We learn that Julian is attending a new school and has regrets about his previous behavior. His grandmother reluctantly agrees to tell him her life story, realizing that the younger generation needs to learn about history in order to make sure that they will not repeat the mistakes of the past. Julian and the readers will be touched and transfixed by Grandmere’s experiences, and ultimately changed by her revelations. This book is a good introduction to the Holocaust for middle school aged children. The graphic novel format is quite popular for today’s youngsters, and if utilized properly, may serve as a stepping stone to more challenging and traditional forms of reading. The author of the Wonder book series has the knack of knowing what her audience wants and needs in reading materials. She understands children and teens and her books reflect this compassion and insight. I highly recommend this book for tweens and their parents and teachers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    The Hofs

    Devoured and enjoyed by all the in house readers. A little sad for the youngest but very well done! Bravo!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    I loved White Bird. It will appeal to fans of Wonder who are willing to try something different. Certainly the kindness theme runs throughout coupled with the fact that it sometimes takes courage to be kind. I think a lot of kids will see themselves in the character of Sara. She is not a bully, but stands by while Julien is teased and tormented. Kids need to learn how to be an ally and how to advocate for others. The lesson is: don't wait for others to be kind, you should always be kind first! I I loved White Bird. It will appeal to fans of Wonder who are willing to try something different. Certainly the kindness theme runs throughout coupled with the fact that it sometimes takes courage to be kind. I think a lot of kids will see themselves in the character of Sara. She is not a bully, but stands by while Julien is teased and tormented. Kids need to learn how to be an ally and how to advocate for others. The lesson is: don't wait for others to be kind, you should always be kind first! It will pair well with Diary of a Young Girl, also available in graphic novel.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    **May Contain Spoilers** If you have already read R.J. Palacio's book Wonder, than you might remember 10-year-old Julian, the boy who bullied Auggie and made his life so difficult. Well, every bully has a reason for being like that and so R.J. wrote The Julian Chapter to help readers understand him. And if you've also read The Julian Chapter, you may remember his Grandmére telling him about her experience in WWII, hiding from the Nazis. Well, now White Bird, done in graphic format, ex **May Contain Spoilers** If you have already read R.J. Palacio's book Wonder, than you might remember 10-year-old Julian, the boy who bullied Auggie and made his life so difficult. Well, every bully has a reason for being like that and so R.J. wrote The Julian Chapter to help readers understand him. And if you've also read The Julian Chapter, you may remember his Grandmére telling him about her experience in WWII, hiding from the Nazis. Well, now White Bird, done in graphic format, expands that story and you won't want to miss it. Given a school assignment to interview someone he knows for his humanities class, Julian, in a video chat with his Grandmére in France, asks if she would tell him again about the boy named Julien who saved her life during the Nazi occupation of France. As Grandmére begins her story, the novel flashback to that time. Living in Paris with her mother, a math teacher, and father, a renowned surgeon, Sara Blum is a happy, friendly Jewish girl, not very good a math, but very artistic. In school, Sara has been sitting next to a boy named Julien for years, but has never spoken to him. Julien had been stricken with polio and now walks with crutches. Nicknamed Tourteau because of crab-like gait, he is the subject of some pretty cruel treatment, especially by the school bully and Nazi sympathizer, Vincent. After France falls to the Nazis in 1940, little by little life becomes difficult for French Jews, but Sara and her family live in the free zone (Vichy France - no explanation about this in the text) and they believe they are relatively safe. That is, until the winter 1943, when the Nazis begin roundups. As the Jewish children in Sara's school are rounded up one day and taken away by the Nazis, Sara is able to escape and hide in the unused bell tower. Which is where Julien finds her before the Nazis do (but how did he know she was there?) and sneaks her out through the city sewers, taking her to his family's barn, where she can hide in the hayloft. Sara remains hiding in the hayloft until the end of the war with the help of Julien and his parents, hiding from nosy neighbors who are believed to support the Nazis, and knowing she will probably never see her parents again. White Bird is Palacio's debut graphic novel and the graphic format worked for me because I know kids like them and there's a good chance they will read this book. I also like a well-done comic. It doesn't bother me that the panels aren't perfectly lined up and I prefer the inking to be done is soft colors rather that bold garish colors for this targeted age group. The novel is divided into three parts that take place when Sara is in hiding and after the war, plus a prologue and epilogue in the present day, and each is introduced with a relevant quote by people like George Santayana, Anne Frank, and Muriel Rukeyser. So, while I do feel that White Bird is a very worthwhile book when I first read it, a second reading revealed some flaws. As with her other Wonder books, the real agenda of White Bird is to extend the message of kindness, as Julien's mother tells Sara: "In these dark times, it's those small acts of kindness that keep us alive, after all. They remind us of our humanity." But, with this message in mind, it must be very difficult to find a balance of what to reveal and what to not include when writing a Holocaust story. My feeling about White Bird is that it a book full of good intentions, a book about resistance and courage, that carries an important message for today's world, given the rise of nationalism, but doesn't quite find this delicate balance. This makes it a somewhat flawed novel. Sara lived in a barn's hayloft and yet no Nazis ever demanded to search it, as they did in reality, looking for hidden Jews. And one only gets a hint at the horror of the Holocaust, as when the Nazis discover what happened to the other Jewish school children and kill the marquisard who was trying to save them (what's a marquisard?) Yes, this is dealt with in the back matter, but how many 10-year-olds look at back matter? What drove me really crazy is the Sara was such a passive character. She did nothing to help herself, Julien's family, or the resistance. Maybe I've read too many books where the Jewish protagonist acts that I've come to expect that kind of resistance action. Sara should have been more of a heroic character, but her passivity precludes her from that. In the end, though, I would highly recommend this book for middle grade readers. What saves it for me is connecting the events of WWII and the Holocaust to the present day policies towards refugees, as Santayana reminds us: those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Back matter does include an Afterword by Ruth Franklin, an Author's Note, a Glossary, a Suggested Reading List, and Organizations and Resources for further research, and a Bibliography. This book is recommended for readers age 9+ This book was borrowed from the NYPL

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Collazo

    A must for every school library, including elementary. Like Daniel’s story that I mentioned at the top of this review, White Bird introduces younger children to the atrocities of the Holocaust in an age-appropriate way. It’s incredibly sad, and yes, the Nazis murder people. But it’s also hopeful and shows readers how kindness can shine through even in the darkest of times. WHAT I LIKED I read this in one sitting. It’s easy to get into and difficult to put down. It’s sad but also hopeful./>WHAT A must for every school library, including elementary. Like Daniel’s story that I mentioned at the top of this review, White Bird introduces younger children to the atrocities of the Holocaust in an age-appropriate way. It’s incredibly sad, and yes, the Nazis murder people. But it’s also hopeful and shows readers how kindness can shine through even in the darkest of times. WHAT I LIKED I read this in one sitting. It’s easy to get into and difficult to put down. It’s sad but also hopeful. I loved the characters of Julien and Sara. Julien is a boy in Sara’s class who walks with crutches since he survived polio as a child. No one in school really talks to him, and he does not have any friends. Some students bully him with mean words and nicknames, and others bully him physically. But Julien is brave and kind. He clearly learned this from his parents, who are also brave and kind people. Sara is a bit spoiled, and she admits this a few times. Before the Nazi occupation of France, Sara had an easy, happy life with her educated parents, fashionable clothes, and a few good friends. That changes quickly, however, when Nazi police come to Sara’s school and pull all the Jewish students–Sara included–out of class. Sara falls behind the group, which ends up saving her life. She hides in the school’s bell tower until Julien finds her there and takes her home to his parents to hide her. WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE I’ve seen negative reviews of this book where adult readers did not like the author “inserting her politics” at the end. I do understand that point of view, but I can see the comparison the author is trying to make here. The USA did for a time turn a blind eye to Jewish refugees escaping the Nazis. There’s a whole scene in Gratz’s Refugee where the US turns away a cruise ship full of Jewish refugees, which did actually happen. And according to this article from Smithsonian.com, “even with millions of European Jews displaced from their homes, the United States had a poor track record offering asylum.” At the end of White Bird, Sara (as the grandmother) sees a headline about anti-Semitism and Islamophobia increasing. Sadly, the author did not make up these headlines. Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia are increasing throughout the world, especially in the USA and Western Europe. Considering all that, why is R.J. Palacio’s inclusion of these headlines considered “inserting her politics” into the story? I think if people really knew what the refugees–families with small children–fleeing Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras are running away from, maybe they would be more keen to eliminate the government red tape and horrible detention facilities and actually work toward helping these people. Sure, the US doesn’t have to help the refugees, but it’s the right thing to do. Just like Julien’s family helping Sara is the right thing to do. ARTWORK/ILLUSTRATIONS The illustrations are full-color with lots of oranges, yellows, browns, blacks, and blues. Some contain the bright red blood of people who are beaten or shot. A white bird appears throughout the book, symbolizing freedom. LIBRARIANS WILL WANT TO KNOW Themes: Holocaust, kindness, bullying, resistance, disabilities Would adults like this book? yes, though some will not like the political statement at the end Would I buy this for my high school library? YES! Sara and Julien are both in high school, and there is a little romance, too. Would I buy this for my middle school library? YES! Many eighth graders study the Holocaust and The Diary of Anne Frank in eighth grade. This book would be a great alternative for ELL students who might find Anne Frank too difficult to read. It could also serve as an introduction to this difficult-to-talk-about topic. Would I buy this for my elementary school library? YES, but know your school’s culture. There is gun violence and bloodshed. It’s not gratuitous, and it helps to make the story more realistic and heartbreaking. Additionally, many students read Wonder in elementary school, and I think fifth graders would ask to read this. Most reviews recommend Grades 5-8, but SLJ recommends it down to Grade 4. A note on the binding: My book’s binding is not like anything I’ve seen before. It’s looks like a paperback with cardboard hardcovers glued on the front and back, with the paperback spine uncovered. I’ve just read it today, and I can already see some “fuzzy” stuff coming off the hardcover part (photos appear on my blog review). I thought maybe this was just my book since it traveled all the way to China from The Book Depository in the UK. But when I read others’ reviews, I see that I am not alone in my complaint. I paid $25 for the hardcover, but it is not worth $25. I see Amazon lists it at $16.59 as of today, Titlewave lists it at $21.29, and The Book Depository is now down to $22. It’s still a bit too steep for such flimsy binding. I do not think this binding will hold up well in a school library. TRIGGER WARNINGS Language: none Sexuality: mild; one chaste kiss (two frames on the same page) Violence: medium; shows at least two murders and alludes to several others, gun violence, assault (also shows blood) Drugs/Alcohol: mild; one character slips prescription sleep aid medication into another’s drink

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    "You might forget many things in your life, but you never forget kindness. Like love, it stays with you... forever." This is the story of Julian's grandmere, who readers were introduced to in Julian's Chapter in Auggie & Me: three Wonder stories. Do you have to have read Wonder and Auggie & Me to "get something" from this? No. Absolutely not. This story can stand on its own - it's a timeless story of standing tall with love and kindness in a time of war. Audiobook: I don't thi "You might forget many things in your life, but you never forget kindness. Like love, it stays with you... forever." This is the story of Julian's grandmere, who readers were introduced to in Julian's Chapter in Auggie & Me: three Wonder stories. Do you have to have read Wonder and Auggie & Me to "get something" from this? No. Absolutely not. This story can stand on its own - it's a timeless story of standing tall with love and kindness in a time of war. Audiobook: I don't think I've ever listened to a graphic novel as an audiobook before. The full cast of narrators, pacing, music and sound effects were so astounding that I didn't even know I was missing illustrations. I received an ALC from Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group and Libro.Fm.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    I very highly recommend this graphic novel especially if you have read Wonder or Auggie and Me! It was an interesting fictional account of a young girl hiding during WWII which is supported well with the illustrations to guide the children's understanding of the characters. This book should be read by children and adults as the kindness theme runs throughout. Lastly, I particularly liked how the author made a link to what is happening in 'today's' world. I know it’s not in the library I very highly recommend this graphic novel especially if you have read Wonder or Auggie and Me! It was an interesting fictional account of a young girl hiding during WWII which is supported well with the illustrations to guide the children's understanding of the characters. This book should be read by children and adults as the kindness theme runs throughout. Lastly, I particularly liked how the author made a link to what is happening in 'today's' world. I know it’s not in the library so if you want to borrow it I’m more than happy to lend it!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Delmira J

    I really loved how Palacio continued and elaborated on this story. I really enjoyed reading this book and recommend it to anyone who needs an "in my feelings" read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    I loved this book, just like I did with the other Wonder stories. I thought the illustrations were very well done and the message was amazing. I highly recommend this book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karly

    I could not put this down. A fictional account of a young Jewish girl in hiding during WWII told as a graphic novel.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Allen Berrebbi

    Would have been great if the author eliminated the last few pages which took a beautiful story about a horrific time in history, and used it to make an anti-Trump comparison to the border situation. Which the author should have known better. To compare the rounding up and extermination of legal citizens who broke no laws, simply because of who they are, to illegals breaking into a country, breaking laws, and being rounded up to be returned (not killed) is despicable. Outrage that was never there Would have been great if the author eliminated the last few pages which took a beautiful story about a horrific time in history, and used it to make an anti-Trump comparison to the border situation. Which the author should have known better. To compare the rounding up and extermination of legal citizens who broke no laws, simply because of who they are, to illegals breaking into a country, breaking laws, and being rounded up to be returned (not killed) is despicable. Outrage that was never there when other presidents did the same thing. Now if the author compared it to true genocides going on now, like The Rohingya in Myanmar or The Nuer and other ethnic groups in South Sudan, then I would have had more respect for the book. A shame that a few pages ruined an otherwise great story.

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