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When the ladies of the ton of Regency London need discreet assistance, they turn to Rosalind Thorne—in these mysteries inspired by the novels of Jane Austen . . . Trust is a delicate thing, and no one knows that better than Rosalind Thorne. Lady Melbourne has entrusted her with recovering a packet of highly sensitive private letters stolen from her desk. The contents of When the ladies of the ton of Regency London need discreet assistance, they turn to Rosalind Thorne—in these mysteries inspired by the novels of Jane Austen . . .   Trust is a delicate thing, and no one knows that better than Rosalind Thorne. Lady Melbourne has entrusted her with recovering a packet of highly sensitive private letters stolen from her desk. The contents of these letters hold great interest for the famous poet Lord Byron, who had carried on a notorious public affair with Lady Melbourne's daughter-in-law, the inconveniently unstable Lady Caroline Lamb. Rosalind is to take up residence in Melbourne House, posing as Lady Melbourne's confidential secretary. There, she must discover the thief and regain possession of the letters before any further scandal erupts.   However, Lady Melbourne omits a crucial detail. Rosalind learns from the Bow Street runner, Adam Harkness, that an unidentified woman was found dead in the courtyard of Melbourne House. The coroner has determined she was poisoned. Adam urges Rosalind to use her new position in the household to help solve the murder. As she begins to untangle a web of secrets and blackmail, Rosalind finds she must risk her own life to bring the desperate business to an end . . .


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When the ladies of the ton of Regency London need discreet assistance, they turn to Rosalind Thorne—in these mysteries inspired by the novels of Jane Austen . . . Trust is a delicate thing, and no one knows that better than Rosalind Thorne. Lady Melbourne has entrusted her with recovering a packet of highly sensitive private letters stolen from her desk. The contents of When the ladies of the ton of Regency London need discreet assistance, they turn to Rosalind Thorne—in these mysteries inspired by the novels of Jane Austen . . .   Trust is a delicate thing, and no one knows that better than Rosalind Thorne. Lady Melbourne has entrusted her with recovering a packet of highly sensitive private letters stolen from her desk. The contents of these letters hold great interest for the famous poet Lord Byron, who had carried on a notorious public affair with Lady Melbourne's daughter-in-law, the inconveniently unstable Lady Caroline Lamb. Rosalind is to take up residence in Melbourne House, posing as Lady Melbourne's confidential secretary. There, she must discover the thief and regain possession of the letters before any further scandal erupts.   However, Lady Melbourne omits a crucial detail. Rosalind learns from the Bow Street runner, Adam Harkness, that an unidentified woman was found dead in the courtyard of Melbourne House. The coroner has determined she was poisoned. Adam urges Rosalind to use her new position in the household to help solve the murder. As she begins to untangle a web of secrets and blackmail, Rosalind finds she must risk her own life to bring the desperate business to an end . . .

30 review for And Dangerous to Know

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    I love this Regency-set historical mystery series, but this was not my favorite outing. Rosalind Thorne is a lady in reduced circumstances who has fashioned a rather unique niche for herself in the ton. She provides the great and good her services as a planner of social events, solver of delicate “problems” (messy, embarrassing stuff that can ruin reputations - like compromising letters), and by being generally “useful”. Rosalind is a great character. I also like the other returning characters, I love this Regency-set historical mystery series, but this was not my favorite outing. Rosalind Thorne is a lady in reduced circumstances who has fashioned a rather unique niche for herself in the ton. She provides the great and good her services as a planner of social events, solver of delicate “problems” (messy, embarrassing stuff that can ruin reputations - like compromising letters), and by being generally “useful”. Rosalind is a great character. I also like the other returning characters, like her dear friends Alice and George Littlefield, who’ve also weathered family disaster and reinvented themselves as newspaper reporters; Mrs. Kendricks, her thoroughly unflappable housekeeper; and Adam Harkness, a Bow Street Runner she has worked with previously, and with whom she shares an obvious, though of course, unstated attraction. One of the underlying conflicts in this book was, would Rosalind continue her work, maintaining her independence, and possibly pursue a relationship with Adam, or would she take up the marriage offer made to her by Devin, her first love as a young girl, who has re-entered her life as the Duke of Casselmain, and could return her to the station t0 which she had been born? Readers are left hanging - Rosalind is heading to a friend’s wedding in the country, at the duke’s estate, where we assume Devin will court her. That was not my problem with this mystery - indeed, the romantic conflict was handled subtly, and did not interfere with the rest of the plot. I just had a hard time navigating the Byzantine social machinations and multi-layered conversations Rosalind was constantly forced to navigate. It was draining, and I wasn’t always sure what was actually being implied - I don’t know how Rosalind does it! A woman is found dead in the grounds of Melbourne House in London. Harkness is called to try and learn her identity, and who poisoned her; his work converges with Rosalind’s latest case - she has been asked to stay at Melbourne House and recover some compromising letters stolen from the formidable, socially powerful Lady Melbourne’s desk. Also involved are her son, William Lamb, her detested daughter-in-law, Lady Caroline, grandson Augustus, and the notorious Lord Byron (although we don’t actually meet him, he is in exile in Europe). I’m not sure if my confusion was rooted in being unfamiliar with the Melbourne House crowd, beyond being aware Lady Caroline had a scandalous affair with Byron, and was thought to be mad; or with forgetting some of the character developments from the last book (a problem I often have with favorite authors who publish a book a year). I very much enjoy the characters, dialogue, attention to historical detail - I have no complaints about the writing, it is just the elaborate conversations and verbal sparring Rosalind has with just about every character, whether Lady Melbourne, Caroline, or the suspected blackmailers. Natural, I guess, for a mystery revolving around blackmail and stolen letters - so many secrets, so much deceit! I felt sorry for Rosalind at the end, she was exhausted, and understandably so; she solved the murder, but had really been through the mill trying to sort through all the secrets and lies. I look forward to the next book in the series to see where this author takes these wonderful characters next.

  2. 5 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    When the body of an unidentified woman is brought to Bow Street, Principal Officer Adam Harkness is concerned because the woman was found in the courtyard of Melbourne House. Lady Melbourne is one of the highest sticklers of the ton and will not take kindly to Bow Street asking questions. Thankfully, Adam knows the one person who can ask important questions to find out the woman's identity and who killed her. Little does Adam know, Rosalind Thorne has just accepted a position at Melbourne House When the body of an unidentified woman is brought to Bow Street, Principal Officer Adam Harkness is concerned because the woman was found in the courtyard of Melbourne House. Lady Melbourne is one of the highest sticklers of the ton and will not take kindly to Bow Street asking questions. Thankfully, Adam knows the one person who can ask important questions to find out the woman's identity and who killed her. Little does Adam know, Rosalind Thorne has just accepted a position at Melbourne House to help Lady Melbourne find a packet of missing letters. The letters belong to the notorious Lord Byron, now living in exile, and would cause a huge scandal if made public, which is what Lady Melbourne fears. Lady Melbourne's "mad" daughter-in-law, Lady Caroline, had a passionate affair with Byron that ended badly and caused a scandal. Lady Melbourne would do anything to protect her family and her son's political ambitions. He claims his wife doesn't have the letters and Lady Melbourne believes him. Rosalind isn't so sure. She's certain someone or all of them are lying to her. She's wary of Lady Melbourne but determined to find justice for the unfortunate murder victim. I am very much impressed with this novel. This series keeps getting better and better. The Regency setting felt very realistic and the murder made sense given the context of the time. There's a little bit of telling and a bit of repetitive dialogue to relay facts. I suppose one could figure out the murder easily enough but I really didn't. I only got it as Rosalind made her conclusion. I love how real life people are a major part of the story. They feel very real. Of course I've heard about Caro Lamb, she of the dampened skirts, and the "mad, bad and dangerous to know" Lord Byron. This story put a different spin on Caroline's story, portraying her as an unconventional, misunderstood woman. She may have been mentally ill, she may have been just spoiled but no one can deny she was a good mother to her son Augustus, who had special needs. I found Caroline's relationship to her son in the story very touching and sweet. It's a different relationship than most Regency parents had with their children, especially children that weren't considered normal, like George Austen. Slowly I found Caroline to be a likable, flesh and blood woman instead of the crazy, wild woman she's normally made out to be. She becomes one of many women who didn't conform to society's expectations in this story and that makes the story very sad. There are a couple of minor inaccuracies in language usage but only minor. Lady Melbourne is a super high stickler. She can make or break a woman's reputation and she isn't afraid to manipulate people to get what she wants. Lady Melbourne is ruthless and should be a politician herself. Her son William creeps me out a bit. Far from the fatherly Lord Melbourne in Victoria he is younger here and protective of his family. He loves his wife and his mother but if he feels someone is a threat, he will take care of it, I'm sure. I did not like how quick he was to accept a skewed version of the truth about Rosalind without checking with his mother or even asking her for an explanation first. He also gave me the creeps towards the end with his frank conversation with Rosalind. Claridge, Lady Melbourne's ladies' maid is not happy with her lot in life, her position, the Melbourne House set, etc. etc. She's a complainer and a gossip! Yet I sense she is also fiercely loyal to her employer and would do anything to protect her ladyship. Mrs. Kendricks, Rosalind's housekeeper, has a lot to complain about but doesn't. She's steadfast and true. I really like her common sense, bravery and sense of loyalty. I suspect Mrs. Kendricks would like Claridge to be the killer. I would too. Her testimony about what happened when and where seems a bit off. She either knows more or less than she lets on. Lord Byron has sent his friend Mr. Scrope Berdmore Davies to retrieve the letters from Lady Melbourne. Rosalind doesn't trust Mr. Davies. Davies, a dandy and known gambler, may already have the letters or may want the letters to extort money from Lady Melbourne. He isn't pleasant to deal with and I don't much like him but I do admire him for being a true friend to Byron. Davies is an annoyance but Fullerton is a real menace. He has a grudge against Rosalind for thwarting his blackmail scheme yet he isn't done lying and manipulating. I can see him being a ruthless killer. Dr. Bellingham is a minor, forgotten character. I don't have much faith in doctors of this period and Bellingham seems like a pompous fool and a wannabe social climber. I don't want him treating Lady Caroline! I want to go to Cornwall and get Dr. Enys to see her instead. Bellingham's treatments seem to make Caroline worse instead of better. Dr. Bellingham was able to identify the victim as a Mrs. Judith Oslander, a nurse who sometimes worked with him. To Caroline, Mrs. Oslander was an evil woman, forcing medicine down Caroline's throat acting menacing and mean. To others, Mrs. Oslander provided comfort and peace of mind. She was neat, clean, efficient and really didn't deserve to die. She is an example of yet another woman who refused to behave and paid a terrible price. Rosalind has come a long way in a short time. She's very mature and level-headed because she's had to be. She's also compassionate and caring. I like how she handles Lady Melbourne with firmness and how she knows how to deal with the pompous Bow Street Runner John Townsend. Rosalind is determined not to be cowed by anyone and to see justice done. I really admire her. I don't like the love triangle but I see where she's coming from. I think she enjoys her independence and probably won't choose Devon. Adam is a much better man yet not of her class. Adam isn't in the story much. He's removed from the case and put on a path to promotion. The fool Townsend can't see where Adam's passion and talent is- for catching thieves. Adam isn't interested in hobnobbing with the royals. Townsend assumes everyone is a social climber like him. Yet I think I can see that a promotion means the social gulf between Adam and Rosalind would shrink a bit! They have chemistry and they care a lot for each other but is it enough for Rosalind to give up everything she's been brought up to want and expect? (Please, yes!) I hope Adam opens up to his friend Gautier. I really like the easy-going French-African man and his relationship with his wife. Rosalind's friend Alice seems to know Rosalind's feelings but doesn't understand why Rosalind doesn't encourage Devon more. As an independent woman, Alice should understand but she doesn't have as much money or social credit as Rosalind and if she doesn't marry well, she could starve. I like her high spirits and determination. She's a good foil for Rosalind, who is very serious. I hope there's a fourth book in this series. I am eager to see what problems Rosalind solves next.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    After her father and sister abandoned the family after he destroyed their finances and after her mother passed a few years ago, Rosalind Thorne has been forced to make her own way living by her own wits as a 'gentlewoman of reduced circumstances.' Recruited by Lady Jersey, Rosalind is called to the home of the prestigious Lady Melbourne to recover a bundle of sensitive correspondence that have been stolen from a locked desk drawer. In order to investigate Rosalind will need to stay on in Lady After her father and sister abandoned the family after he destroyed their finances and after her mother passed a few years ago, Rosalind Thorne has been forced to make her own way living by her own wits as a 'gentlewoman of reduced circumstances.' Recruited by Lady Jersey, Rosalind is called to the home of the prestigious Lady Melbourne to recover a bundle of sensitive correspondence that have been stolen from a locked desk drawer. In order to investigate Rosalind will need to stay on in Lady Melbourne's home posing as her own private secretary. Not only must she identify the thief, she must also track them down and return them to Lady Melbourne before they cause an irrepairable scandal. Lady Melbourne is not giving Rosalind all the facts available. When Adam Harkness comes calling with the news of  an unknown woman found dead within the gates of Melbourne House, Rosalind will have to contend with the danger of not only posing as a member of staff in a powerful household and a blackmailer, but of an unknown murderer. ____________________________ And Dangerous to Know is the third book in Darcy Wilde's Rosalind Thorne Mysteries series. Before I get to the actual review, I just want to mention that the covers for the books in this series are gorgeous. I don't want to give away anything of the mystery, so I'll try to be vague. I was pretty sure that I knew who the villian was here but a few of the characters and the twisting of the plot left room for more than one red herring in the mix that will have you changing your mind more than once. I love a good mystery that will keep me guessing. I adore regency mysteries and I love the historic tone of this series, the research is evident and pulls you in and immerses you in the story. The historical characters, like Lord Byron and Lady Caroline Lamb, are woven into the story so nicely alongside the fictional ones. I found it very interesting that Wilde was able to give such a sense of these historical figures through only snippets of correspondence (which lead us into each chapter) and being talked about by the other characters. For example, we never actually meet Byron in this book, but you feel like you really get a sense of his character. A lot of mysteries run the risk of having either no sense of danger or too much to the point that the mystery looses any sense of reality. But this series has a great balance of danger, especially for our main characters. I'm not a fan of love triangles, but this one works... mostly because it is barely a love triangle. The men aren't competing to win the affections of one woman here, there just happen to be two men in her life. One that represents her past and another that represents her future. Rosalind and Devon share a history and affection. Adam and Rosalind share attraction and lifestyles. A future with Devon means a return to the life she was raised to and a future with Adam means a life with a man from the world in which she now lives and has built for herself. I certainly know where I stand on this matter and his name is Harkness. I love Rosalind's character, she is clever and compassionate and I look forward to seeing what mystery she'll face next.. perhaps at the Casselmaine estate? This book ends with a nice transition to lead us into the next book in the series, which I am very much looking forward to. I recommend this book and the entire series to fans of recency mysteries. If you enjoy the Lady Darby series by Anna Lee Huber, you'll love this series. _____ Many thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Books for sharing an eARC with me of And Dangerous to Know by Darcy Wilde. This is my honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    YES! The cover is here! I go back and forth on whether Im rooting for Devon or Adam, but judging by how excited I was that the latter was in the synopsis, I guess Im more into Adam at the moment.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    When a mystery series is introduced with such words as, “…inspired by the novels of Jane Austen”, you may be sure that I will be more than willing to delve right in with alacrity. Wilde created a capable heroine who was high born, fallen with her family’s disgrace, and risen by her own resolution and strength as a useful woman to those who were once her peers and what began with curiosity continues to impress with deep appreciation for her spirit and intelligence. And Dangerous to Know is so When a mystery series is introduced with such words as, “…inspired by the novels of Jane Austen”, you may be sure that I will be more than willing to delve right in with alacrity. Wilde created a capable heroine who was high born, fallen with her family’s disgrace, and risen by her own resolution and strength as a useful woman to those who were once her peers and what began with curiosity continues to impress with deep appreciation for her spirit and intelligence. And Dangerous to Know is so titled to best suit one of the intriguing real historical elements of this third installment in the Rosalind Thorne series which works best read in order. In this latest, Rosalind is involved with ‘mad, bad, and dangerous to know’ Lord Byron, indirectly. While never actually present, he can be felt throughout the book. Rosalind has recovered from her last encounter with murder and peacefully keeping up her prodigious amounts of correspondence, her household affairs, and trying to help her friend Alice figure out where Alice’s brother George has been disappearing to each evening. Meanwhile, she ponders the affairs of her conflicted heart- a duke or a detective. This is all interrupted when an imperious summons brings her to the august doors of Melbourne House and she encounters its notorious mistress, Lady Melbourne, and her more notorious daughter in law, Lady Caroline Lamb. Lady Melbourne has letters written by Lord Byron that have gone missing and they are such that ruin for several will happen if they are ever published or the contents bandied about. Rosalind has a bad feeling about the whole thing, but when Lady Jersey recommended her and another society queen wishes to hire her, there is only one answer to give. When she goes home to retrieve her things to stay at Melbourne House pretending to be Lady M’s social secretary, Adam Harkness arrives with an even grimmer commission, but oddly related because a body was delivered to Bow Street and it had come from Melbourne House. Adam can’t get inside and investigate such aristocratic people, but Rosalind can. She agrees to help him. The investigation is complicated by more people knowing about Byron’s letters than at first thought and all of them having strong motives to take them. No one claims to know anything about a visiting nurse’s disappearance save the laudanum-crazed Lady Caroline and the doctor who hides his grief over the loss. Adam plans to back Rosalind up and follow up on his end of the investigation when a jealous superior pulls him off the case and puts him on another while directing Adam to accept social invitations to hobnob with the upper classes. He claims Adam’s star is on the rise and he’s trying to help him. Adam just wants to do his job and doesn’t appreciate the interference, but he has to be careful because his career is on the line and the supervisor already doesn’t like Rosalind since she was crucial in solving past cases. He has to make sure she is safe since he feels her put her into danger investigating such a powerful family and she means a great deal more to him than she should since there is a class difference. Rosalind will find a way through it all if anyone can. And Dangerous to Know pulled me right back into Rosalind’s regency world where wealth and splendor are veneer for true human nature and motives. There is grit and grime to these stories and not just palatial homes and glittering balls. The main characters are vulnerable and flawed people as well as gifted at what they do. Rosalind gets the bulk of the narration with Adam the close second, but there are also snippets from other major players so the reader gets a multi-faceted story. There are complexities to each character that make them as mysterious as the main plot. The blend of fiction and real life is seamless and it is fun to see how the author chooses to fill in the details of what can only be guessed at when it comes to the characters. I’ve read a biography of Lord Byron and read some of his poetry, which sorry, wasn’t my thing, so I could appreciate what the author did with the real life personages in this story especially Lady Caroline and her husband, William Lamb. I thought the author’s balance between sympathetic and wanton was just the right touch. The mystery kept me guessing until the final clues fell into place. I had that moment when the light bulb lit and I felt I should have seen the truth before and was as distracted as Rosalind about where the facts were leading which is always fun in a mystery. The ending felt rushed and left me somewhat dazed. I still had a few questions once the dust settled. After being introduced to all those characters, I would have liked their responses when the truth was revealed and not just a couple. However, I can’t claim deep disappointment since I finished with a strong desire to have the next book in my hands. There are definitely a couple plot threads that are meant to carry over into the next book. All in all, it was another smashing success in the series and I can’t recommend it enough to those who enjoy a more authentic historical backdrop, complex female lead, whiff of romance, and cunning mystery. I rec'd a copy of this book from Net Galley to read in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    In this third installment in the series Rosalind finds herself being summoned to Melbourne House and tasked with the job of finding missing letters, the contents of which would bring even greater scandal to Lady Melbourne’s household. Rosalind would rather not get involved with the dramas of this notorious family, but also realizes that her financial well-being is dependent on staying in the good graces of the socially powerful. While trying to decide how to proceed, her friend Adam Harkness a In this third installment in the series Rosalind finds herself being summoned to Melbourne House and tasked with the job of finding missing letters, the contents of which would bring even greater scandal to Lady Melbourne’s household. Rosalind would rather not get involved with the dramas of this notorious family, but also realizes that her financial well-being is dependent on staying in the good graces of the socially powerful. While trying to decide how to proceed, her friend Adam Harkness a Bow Street officer, requests her assistance in discreetly investigating the murder of a woman whose body was brought to Bow Street from Melbourne House itself. Taking up residence at Melbourne House, Rosalind must sort through the abundance of lies, half-truths and paranoid suspicions coming from the various members of the household. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I especially enjoyed the weaving of historical characters with a fictional mystery. While it is not completely necessary to read the other books in the series to understand this one, it would be a shame to miss out on the character development and the background of the, for lack of better term, ‘love triangle’ (which, in my opinion, is exceedingly well handled and far more believable than most). Rosalind’s personal life mostly takes a backseat in this book, but it looks like it might get more focus in the next one. Content-wise, I would place this at the low end of PG-13. There is some mild language and a fair amount of discussion regarding the scandalous life of Lord Byron and all those connected to him. The only mildly gruesome content is the description of the injuries observed on the murder victim at the very beginning. Thank you so much to NetGalley and Kensington Books for providing me with an ARC!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    Rosalind gets mixed up in a very delicate case involving murder and missing letters, thanks to Lady Jersey (Patroness of Almack's) and Adam Harkness (Bow Street investigator). Lady Jersey wants Rosalind to help Lady Melbourne recover some 'stolen' letters of a very sensitive nature (Lord Byron, ahem) and enlists Rosalind to be the major helper. Harkness would appreciate Rosalind finding out the identity of a murdered woman whose body was recently delivered to Bow Street from the grounds of Rosalind gets mixed up in a very delicate case involving murder and missing letters, thanks to Lady Jersey (Patroness of Almack's) and Adam Harkness (Bow Street investigator). Lady Jersey wants Rosalind to help Lady Melbourne recover some 'stolen' letters of a very sensitive nature (Lord Byron, ahem) and enlists Rosalind to be the major helper. Harkness would appreciate Rosalind finding out the identity of a murdered woman whose body was recently delivered to Bow Street from the grounds of Melbourne House. There are a lot of twists and turns along the way. We get a peek at the power politics of Bow Street; we meet Lady Melbourne's very strange daughter-in-law (Lady Caroline Lamb); we watch Rosalind walk a very narrow tightrope, all the while striving to maintain her integrity. Great stuff! The author paints Caro Lamb in a very sympathetic light; I liked that. Lady Melbourne and her son (William Lamb) are not treated as gently. The mysteries are cleared up in a satisfactory manner. What isn't cleared up is Rosalind's love life. Those readers who were hoping for a definite answer on that subject will have to wait for the next book. And there better be a next book...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Wilson

    Very disappointing. I did not appreciate the se of real historic figures as the lead characters. While the author attempted to cast suspicion on the members of the family, anyone knowing the history knew they were not murderers. Also, by the third volume it's time to pick the hero.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Until a week ago, I had never heard of the author Darcie Wilde. I have since listened to all 3 books in the Rosalind Thorne series, and am eagerly awaiting more books in the series. I recommend this series to readers who enjoy Deanna Raybourn's Veronica Speedwell series or C.S. Harris' Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    4.25 Stars This is the third book in the Rosalind Thorne mystery series by Darcie Wilde. You need to go into this book knowing that this piece is set in the early 1800. Back then the speech was more stiff and proper. So, if you are looking for the normal flow you see in regular era books, you aren’t going to find it here. That is due mostly to the Regency setting. If you love a good Jane Austen book, you will definitely love this. But go in aware of the setting in order to get the most out of this 4.25 Stars This is the third book in the Rosalind Thorne mystery series by Darcie Wilde. You need to go into this book knowing that this piece is set in the early 1800. Back then the speech was more stiff and proper. So, if you are looking for the normal flow you see in regular era books, you aren’t going to find it here. That is due mostly to the Regency setting. If you love a good Jane Austen book, you will definitely love this. But go in aware of the setting in order to get the most out of this novel. I had a bit of trouble getting into the book due to all the properness and the dropping of so many names with Lord and Lady attached to them. My mind started to swim. I am not a normal reader of a Regency era book. If you have a bit of trouble too, I suggest listening to it on audio book. I let my kindle read it to me and found it all made so much more sense. The entire concept of the novel is intriguing. You don’t find ladies like Rosalind much in 1800’s era fiction. She is very intuitive and pays attention to her surroundings. She can also make great leaps in logic. And she does this all while muttering to herself reminding herself to be a proper lady in the midst of the mystery and deception. She reminded me a lot of a female Sherlock Holmes. I can see how someone could easily get lost in a novel of this era. The setting really overwhelmed me. I always wonder how authors can so get in touch with such a setting and nail it when offering it to the public. Great book. I will definitely pick up the previous two books just to see what I have missed. This book may be a bit different than what we are used to in the cozy world but different isn’t always bad. Check this out and test it for yourself. You won’t be disappointed. I received this as an ARC (Advanced Reader Copy) in return for an honest review. I thank NetGalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me to read this title.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    "And Dangerous to Know" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the third book in the series. You don't need to read the previous books to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mysteries. This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind, Harkness (and those helping them) asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. Whodunit was guessable but not obvious. The characters were "And Dangerous to Know" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the third book in the series. You don't need to read the previous books to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mysteries. This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind, Harkness (and those helping them) asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. Whodunit was guessable but not obvious. The characters were interesting and reacted realistically to events. The historical details were woven into the story, and the author clearly put research time into getting those details correct. There was no sex. There was a minor amount of bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting mystery. I received this book as a review copy from the publisher.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne. I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW. Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging. Ms. Wilde has written an Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne. I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW. Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging. Ms. Wilde has written an entertaining and engaging book and I enjoyed every minute I spent with it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Lynx

    Very good. I liked the ending.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    And Dangerous to Know earns 5+/5 Stolen Letters...Engaging Entertainment! The death of an unidentified woman is obviously murder, but Adam Harkness, the principal officer at the Bow Street Station, is disappointed the King’s coroner is prepared only to make personal notes, then quietly have her interred. Nothing official, no public notice, no warrant allowing Harkness to inquire further. The body was found at the gates of Melbourne House, residence of the very influential Lord Melbourne, and it And Dangerous to Know earns 5+/5 Stolen Letters...Engaging Entertainment! The death of an unidentified woman is obviously murder, but Adam Harkness, the principal officer at the Bow Street Station, is disappointed the King’s coroner is prepared only to make personal notes, then quietly have her interred. Nothing official, no public notice, no warrant allowing Harkness to inquire further. The body was found at the gates of Melbourne House, residence of the very influential Lord Melbourne, and it would be inappropriate, if not career ending, to put under suspicion anyone in that family, despite quiet rumors of scandalous indiscretions. However, if someone discreet could ingratiate “herself,” and without notice, investigate and find answers...Miss Rosalind Thorne is brought to mind. Rosalind Thorne has been approached by Lady Jersey, who is personally aware of her unique abilities, to provide her “particular assistance” to Viscountess Melbourne. A packet of letters, letters that would prove embarrassing to her, her family, and George Gordon, Lord Byron, have been stolen. Acting as Lady Melbourne’s confidential secretary, she would be well positioned to ask questions, search private areas, overhear quiet conversations, and hopefully locate the stolen property. Living at Melbourne House offers some challenge since Rosalind’s wardrobe has not seen an upgrade since her family’s financial crisis, but a five hundred pound stipend is quite the inducement or is it a bribe...payment for her complete silence. After Adam Harkness relates his predicament with investigating the young woman’s murder, Rosalind observes, “It would seem, Mr. Harkness, that our paths have converged.” Brilliant! I am new to this series by Darcie Wilde, and after only a few pages of the third book in her Rosalind Thorne Mysteries, I am a big fan! Setting the drama in the early nineteenth century is unique in my experience (I see Jane Austen’s Emma Woodhouse and Mr. Darcy) offering fascinating historical insights into events of the day, the English ton, and the criminal justice system such as it is. Darcie Wilde also pens historical romances, so this mystery seems to take on an epic nature delving more deeply into relationships, interactions, and formal and informal social gatherings along with the drama of a murder investigation. Each chapter cleverly begins with a title and passage from the sought after “personal correspondence” selected to illustrate directly and indirectly the drama and provide insights into background, behaviors, and motives. Darcie’s writing style using a third-person narrative with descriptive language and dialogue that does well to show tone of the era, emotions, and personalities. The mystery was an engrossing tale with twists and secrets; the insights into the “ton” were fascinating reminiscent of dynamics that might be found in Downton Abbey, but a century earlier; the characters were varied, well-developed, and realistic as I understand, with Rosalind’s strength and intelligence and Alice’s independence and ambition a real delight. Then Adam....ooooh! I loved it and am eager to read the first two books! All three Rosalind Thorne books are available on Audible with A Useful Woman and A Purely Private Matter narrated by the delightful Sarah Nichols. However, And Dangerous to Know is narrated by the fabulously talented Pearl Hewitt, my all time favorite voice artist. I decided to get the audio version to finish “listening” to Darcie Wilde’s drama. Pearl’s engaging artistry has always enriched my experience; she does well to illustrate tone and various personalities through a change in volume and style along with slight and obvious variations in the British accent to depict dialect, age, gender, and status, even a French-ish accent pops up. A challenge for all female narrators is to perform adequately the male voice which Pearl gives more than an entertaining performance. I loved it and highly recommend Darcie Wilde’s book, especially the audio version! Disclosure: I received an ARC eBook from NetGalley (Kensington). My review is voluntary with honest insights and comments. I purchased the audiobook from Audible.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Helen Howerton

    A dead woman has been found at the gates of Melbourne House. Lord and Lady Melbourne are famous, the upper ton of the ton, as it were. And unfortunately their daughter-in-law is infamous, Lady Caroline Lamb, known for her liaison with George Gordon, "the" Lord Byron of romantic lore. The dead woman is unknown, though. There is a possibility she was killed inside the gates of the mansion -- and a great scandal this would definitely be. Since the police are involved, an investigation must be A dead woman has been found at the gates of Melbourne House. Lord and Lady Melbourne are famous, the upper ton of the ton, as it were. And unfortunately their daughter-in-law is infamous, Lady Caroline Lamb, known for her liaison with George Gordon, "the" Lord Byron of romantic lore. The dead woman is unknown, though. There is a possibility she was killed inside the gates of the mansion -- and a great scandal this would definitely be. Since the police are involved, an investigation must be undertaken, but with the highest secrecy. Adam Harkness, principal officer at Bow Street Police Station, will see to it. While this is happening, another matter has captured the attention of Lady Melbourne. Miss Rosalind Thorne is summoned to the house by Sarah, Lady Jersey, the doyenne of Georgian society. Thus we have the start of And Dangerous to Know, the third of the historical mystery series set in Georgian times by Darcie Wilde. There are letters missing, embarrassing letters. Lady M suspects “they” mean to publish, not blackmail. The scandal would be devastating. She wants Rosalind to stop this from happening. She wants the letters back in any event, whatever the reason for their disappearance. Rosalind agrees to help, moving into the mansion as her ladyship’s new secretary. So she is in place as Mr. Harkness comes on the scene. Both of them will soon have work to do. For the murder and the missing letters must be connected -- mustn’t they? There’s mutual attraction here, of course. But convention ensures only readers are aware of it. Besides, Rosalind has a duke that’s offered her marriage. What’s a girl to do? Especially a poor girl. But at least we do learn of one concrete reason who Rosalind can’t marry her duke. I was glad of that. Rosalind and her policeman do spend a lot of time in this book “thinking.” It’s a way that the author communicates facts. It’s also a way for the plot to get pushed along, but it does tend to get annoying after a while. This is one of those books in which it might help if you know your history, so that you will more completely understand why these people are acting the way they do in these pages. The author does a good job of filling in some of the backstory -- including providing a truly shocking reason for why “the letters” can’t ever see the light of day, something that was hinted about at the time, but it might behoove you to do a little research of your own. The social media darlings of today have nothing on the men and women who flitted through the drawing rooms and ballrooms of British society in the early 19th century. Chapters go back and forth between Rosalind and Adam, so that we can see what is happening from the different points of view. It helps to heighten the tension and serves as quite the page-turner. And a page-turner it is, even though the book bogged down a bit for me with the retelling of the travails of Lady Caroline; as far as the murder goes, pretty much everyone is trying to implicate Lady C, including herself. After we get past that little red herring, we get to the meat of the story and the real mystery and the solving of it. It’s quite a tale. Rosalind may come up against some that would like to see her fail, but that’s never an option. The books ends on a thoughtful note. Rosalind must make some decisions for herself. She’ll work through them, of course, because there are more stories to tell. Thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for a copy of this book in advance of publication, in exchange for this review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deborah E Kehoe

    Rosalind Thorne, due to the error’s of her father, finds herself in an unusual circumstance, managing her own household and making due with “gifts” from the ladies of the ton whom she has helped. Her livelihood is trust and she can’t afford her good name to be smudged, taking that income away. When Lady Melbourne needs help solving the disappearance of some personal letters she agree’s to help track them down but it seems she hasn’t been told the entire story. These letters are connected to a Rosalind Thorne, due to the error’s of her father, finds herself in an unusual circumstance, managing her own household and making due with “gifts” from the ladies of the ton whom she has helped. Her livelihood is trust and she can’t afford her good name to be smudged, taking that income away. When Lady Melbourne needs help solving the disappearance of some personal letters she agree’s to help track them down but it seems she hasn’t been told the entire story. These letters are connected to a woman’s murder on the estate’s property and Rosalind once again finds herself embroiled in a more serious investigation. It’s been almost two years since the previous novel in this series but I easily fell back into these characters and remembered why my instinct was to add this one to the top of my TBR. The era of 18th century England is a fascinating one and this series gives us a different viewpoint of what it’s like to live that we haven’t seen in other novels, tv shows or movies. What happens to young women whose families fall on unfortunate circumstances? Well, worse things than what’s happened to Rosalind and her friend Alice, definitely, but having to “work” for a living while retaining your social status? Interesting and quite hard to navigate as Darcie Wilde portrays so well in her character Rosalind Thorne. I’ll admit that the social intricacies are as interesting to me as the actual mystery Rosalind is trying to solve, but in And Dangerous to Know that mystery is actually quite well done. As Rosalind is investigating the disappearing letters and murder of a young woman she is also figuring out her feelings for her two beau’s. One a dashing Duke from her past life and the other a Bow Street Runner who is closer to the life she is now living. I think this novel brings us closer to a resolution to that storyline, but only just slightly. We are closer to seeing what’s going on in Rosalind’s mind and heart though. The next novel should reveal quite a bit more, or at least I hope so! If you love historical mysteries as much as I but you haven’t read the first two novels in this series then please start at the beginning. Part of the fascination is getting to know these characters and I think you need to do that by reading the books in sequential order. The pace will help you immerse yourself in their world and sets the mood for Rosalind’s investigation. I can’t wait for the next novel, but since it took a while for this novel to be written I probably need to dial down my anticipation, just slightly. ❤️❤️❤️❤️

  17. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Hansen

    This was my first foray into the series (and first time reading this author) and I was definitely pleasantly surprised to find a good historical mystery series I had somehow missed out on...which means there's now two more books I have to find and read! I think because of the cover art I was expecting something a little more like a cozy mystery placed in a historical setting (But without a lot of historical heft) with a lot of witty repartee and more fun-loving-bantering-sassy vibe as heroines This was my first foray into the series (and first time reading this author) and I was definitely pleasantly surprised to find a good historical mystery series I had somehow missed out on...which means there's now two more books I have to find and read! I think because of the cover art I was expecting something a little more like a cozy mystery placed in a historical setting (But without a lot of historical heft) with a lot of witty repartee and more fun-loving-bantering-sassy vibe as heroines are want to be in many of the cozy mysteries. What I got instead was a much more serious minded historical mystery set within the complex society of the regency period, think slow burn seriousness as opposed to witty banter (More Persuasion than Emma). The mystery itself was complex with two separate aspects that eventually connect, and a not easily guessed at perpetrator. And while I could have done with a little more spunk from our heroine (I did not get a total handle on her from this one book, and it could be because I have not read the first two, and she is obviously emotionally conflicted in this story line) I absolutely fell in love with the supporting cast in this one including Adam Harkness and his cohort Sampson Goutier, along with the character of Lady Carolyn Lamb - one of my favorite historical figures to read about during this time period (and her affair with Lord Byron), I love to see how different authors portray her and this is possibly my favorite "version" of her yet! The romantic aspect of this one was disappointing only in her choice of Beau (as in why is she picking THAT guy) at the end...which I'm hoping is just a bump in the road created by author in her getting together with the RIGHT guy. All in all a good historical mystery with more depth than I expected....fans of Tasha Alexander, Stephanie Barron, Anna Lee Huber, C.S. Harris, and Victoria Thompson should all pick up this series and add it to their to-read lists. Thank you to Net Galley and the publisher for my ARC of this book (in exchange for an honest review) - I have definitely found a new series to put on my keepers shelf!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I am a long time fan of historical mysteries but somehow I missed this series. Starting with the third in the series convinced me to put the previous two books on my must read soon list and the series on my list of favorites. Even though I didn't have all of the backstory I felt that this worked well as a stand alone. It's 1817 London and we are introduced to Adam Harkness of the famous Bow Street when he is called by the Coroner of Middlesex which includes London. An unidentified woman has been I am a long time fan of historical mysteries but somehow I missed this series. Starting with the third in the series convinced me to put the previous two books on my must read soon list and the series on my list of favorites. Even though I didn't have all of the backstory I felt that this worked well as a stand alone. It's 1817 London and we are introduced to Adam Harkness of the famous Bow Street when he is called by the Coroner of Middlesex which includes London. An unidentified woman has been delivered to the cellar under the Brown Bear tavern - a mortuary. When the men doing the delivering of the body are questioned about the who and the why of it, all they would share was the pickup location. Because of that, the Coroner calls Harkness as it appears that it involves the Haute Ton and needs a delicate touch to investigate. The woman, it becomes clear, is connected to Melbourne House. The Coroner would prefer to call her a Jane Doe, sign off on the case and put her in a paupers grave. The end. Harkness knows that isn't going to happen and sets out to contact the one person he knows who would be perfectly positioned in society to help him solve the murder. Rosalind Thorne was raised an aristocrat but her father lost his fortune and then abandoned his family. Rosalind now makes her way in life by being both discrete and very clever, helping the Haute Ton deal with rather sticky matters. At the same time Harkness is planning to contact her, Rosalind is visited by Lady Jersey, a veritable whirlwind who knows what she wants and expects to get it. She wants Rosalind to find out who stole a packet of personal letters from Lord Byron and, to do that, she will have to stay awhile at Melbourne House. Two cases - are they connected? I enjoyed every page of this mystery. The setting, the voice, the puzzle, the wonderful characters (both historical and fictional) all came together in a pitch perfect read. My thanks to the publisher Kensington and to NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    This book begins with a corpse, an autopsy and a suspected murder. Adam Harkness, a Bow Street Investigator notices that the deceased’s body is a woman who has unusual marking all around her mouth. Sir David Reese, King’s Coroner gives him a diagnosis of suspected laudanum poisoning disguised in brandy, as well as the fact that the body was found outside the residence of Lord and Lady Melbourne. The afore mentioned Melbourne’s are the In Laws of Lady Caroline Lamb a paramour of Lord Byron. As the This book begins with a corpse, an autopsy and a suspected murder. Adam Harkness, a Bow Street Investigator notices that the deceased’s body is a woman who has unusual marking all around her mouth. Sir David Reese, King’s Coroner gives him a diagnosis of suspected laudanum poisoning disguised in brandy, as well as the fact that the body was found outside the residence of Lord and Lady Melbourne. The afore mentioned Melbourne’s are the In Laws of Lady Caroline Lamb a paramour of Lord Byron. As the above unfolds Rosalind Thorne is called to Melbourne House by Lady Melbourne who has discovered that several letters are missing and this could cause a catastrophic scandal if they are not recovered. These letters would have a major impact on several well known people. Miss Thorne is asked to stay at Melbourne House as she works to find out about these letters. This works for Adam who also asks her to assist him with discovering the identity of the deceased and her connection to Melbourne House. The story is one of twists and turns, lies, red herrings and suspicions interwoven with names of notable people of the era. Intrigue and mystery abound as the plots unfold and the author leads the reader deeper into the story. At times one feels as if they too, are entwined with this unfolding mystery. This is the first book by this author I have read. It is gripping, enthralling and hard to put down. If your are a mystery lover or like historical fiction, you will definitely enjoy reading this book. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Kensington Books through NetGalley. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Myarn

    And Dangerous to Know by Darcie Wilde. (Rosalind Thorne #3). 5 stars This book follows last year's "A Purely Private Matter" and features Miss Rosalind Thorne as the main character. This mystery can be enjoyed as a single title, but you miss quite a bit of background and character development if you don't start with the first book - A Useful Woman. Miss Thorne is part of the aristocracy, albeit on the lower rung. Due to circumstances explained in the first book, she survives by being an And Dangerous to Know by Darcie Wilde. (Rosalind Thorne #3). 5 stars This book follows last year's "A Purely Private Matter" and features Miss Rosalind Thorne as the main character. This mystery can be enjoyed as a single title, but you miss quite a bit of background and character development if you don't start with the first book - A Useful Woman. Miss Thorne is part of the aristocracy, albeit on the lower rung. Due to circumstances explained in the first book, she survives by being an aide/fixer for various aristocrats. She isn't given a salary, but receives favors and gifts for her help which can be monetize later. At the beginning, Rosalind is spending a quiet morning with her friends Alice and George, when Lady Jersey barges in and says that she must accompany her immediately. She is taking Rosalind to Melbourne House, the home of Lady Melbourne one of London's preeminent social and politcal hostess. During her interview with Lady Melbourne, she finds out that some damaging letters have been stolen that references Lord Byron. Earlier, Adam Harkness, an officer from Bow Street is shown a body of an unidentifed woman. She was delivered to Bow Street by carters. When questioned they said they picked up the body at Melbourne House. What follows is an investigation into the identity of the dead woman, the thief that stole the letters, and the murderer. This book was fabulous and exciting, not only because of the intriguing mystery, but for the real individuals that populate the book. We meet a Lady Jersey, Lady Melbourne, Lady Caroline Lamb, and the future Lord Melbourne, Prime Minister to Queen Victoria. In this book, we see more of what Rosalind is thinking and her internal conflicts. The next book will be interesting because Rosalind might have choose between being the person she has grown into or going back to living in the world she was raised for. Thank you Netgalley and Kensington Books for this ARC.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    The Rosalind Thorne series has continued to evolve and, in its third outing, has crossed from very good to excellent. Author Darcie Wilde has written a carefully crafted historical mystery which draws from actual events in the lives of Lord Byron and those impacted by his capricious and unpredictable behavior. His presence and influence permeates the book through actual quotes from his correspondence with characters in the novel, particularly Lady Carolyn Lamb. The mystery involves stolen letters The Rosalind Thorne series has continued to evolve and, in its third outing, has crossed from very good to excellent. Author Darcie Wilde has written a carefully crafted historical mystery which draws from actual events in the lives of Lord Byron and those impacted by his capricious and unpredictable behavior. His presence and influence permeates the book through actual quotes from his correspondence with characters in the novel, particularly Lady Carolyn Lamb. The mystery involves stolen letters which speak to the relationship between Byron and society powerhouse Lady Melbourne, Lamb's mother-in-law. A woman, murdered on the Melbourne estate, was in possession of one of the letters. Rosalind finds herself in a spider's web of motives and suspects which she must navigate while maintaining her very precarious position in Regency London society where a social faux pas can be lethal. Wilde's research into the period is evident and skillfully incorporated into this absorbing story. While the series' romantic triangle (which will hopefully be resolved soon!) does not advance much in this entry, we learn a bit more about Rosalind and the people in her orbit. Highly recommended. Full Disclosure--NetGalley and the publisher provided me with a digital ARC of this book. This is my honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Homerun2

    3.75 stars This third entry in the Rosalind Thorne series finds our protagonist moving into Melbourne House, home to a very well-connected old British peer's family, including the infamous Lady Caroline Lamb, scandalous cast-off lover of Lord Byron. Rosalind has been asked by Bow Street to check into the disappearance of some old letters from Byron which have huge blackmail potential. While you could read this as a standalone, there is a fair amount of background for Rosalind in the two previous 3.75 stars This third entry in the Rosalind Thorne series finds our protagonist moving into Melbourne House, home to a very well-connected old British peer's family, including the infamous Lady Caroline Lamb, scandalous cast-off lover of Lord Byron. Rosalind has been asked by Bow Street to check into the disappearance of some old letters from Byron which have huge blackmail potential. While you could read this as a standalone, there is a fair amount of background for Rosalind in the two previous novels which is useful to know. She has one foot in two worlds -- the privileged world of the aristocracy, where she once belonged before her father shamed the family and disappeared, and the world of more ordinary mortals where she now lives, making a living helping society women solve problems requiring investigative skills and discretion. This is highlighted by the behind the scenes love triangle. Her first love is a peer of the realm, and still willing to make her his duchess. But she also has very strong feelings for Adam Harkness, a Bow Street investigator. Where does she fit in? She honestly is uncertain. Rosalind is a strong and appealing character and it will be interesting to see how she figures out her future. Thanks to the publisher and to Net Galley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Milena

    I enjoyed the first two books in the Rosalind Thorne mysteries and was patiently awaiting the third book. It was a long wait but the latest installment, And Dangerous to Know, did not disappoint. In this book, Rosalind investigates the disappearance of the letters belonging to the famous Lord Byron. Rosalind is hired by Lady Melbourne, whose daughter-in-law is Lady Caroline Lamb, Lord Byron's notorious former lover. In addition to the disappearance of the letters, the body of an unnamed woman I enjoyed the first two books in the Rosalind Thorne mysteries and was patiently awaiting the third book. It was a long wait but the latest installment, And Dangerous to Know, did not disappoint. In this book, Rosalind investigates the disappearance of the letters belonging to the famous Lord Byron. Rosalind is hired by Lady Melbourne, whose daughter-in-law is Lady Caroline Lamb, Lord Byron's notorious former lover. In addition to the disappearance of the letters, the body of an unnamed woman was found near Melbourne's residence. Who was the murdered woman and did she have anything to do with the missing correspondence? Rosalind agrees to help Adam Harkness, the Bow Street runner, to help solve the murder. But solving the murder and the mystery of the missing letters may put Rosalind in danger. This was a very satisfying mystery with interesting characters and brimming with intrigue. I cannot wait to read the next book in the series. *ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Oh my. What a thrill to be back in Rosalind Thorne’s world. It has been much too long since book two, but the author made it incredibly easy to pick up where we left off. The mystery of Lady Melbourne’s stolen letters unfurls at an excellent pace, and I devoured this book as quickly as possible. I was kept guessing as to the villains identity, and felt sympathy for some surprising characters. The love triangle was still in evidence, kind of - it was formed with light sheer scarves, but still Oh my. What a thrill to be back in Rosalind Thorne’s world. It has been much too long since book two, but the author made it incredibly easy to pick up where we left off. The mystery of Lady Melbourne’s stolen letters unfurls at an excellent pace, and I devoured this book as quickly as possible. I was kept guessing as to the villains identity, and felt sympathy for some surprising characters. The love triangle was still in evidence, kind of - it was formed with light sheer scarves, but still triangular. Should there be a fourth book, and I desperately hope there is, the ending of this book leads me to believe the triangle could be resolved more satisfactorily in that fourth book. Fingers crossed! I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This is the 3rd installment of the Rosalind Thorne Mystery Series. Rosalind must take up residence in Lady Melbourne’s house and serve as her private secretary to recover some damaging letters that have been stolen from the estate. All is not what it seems as Adam Harkness a Bow street runner has informed Rosalind that the body of a young woman was delivered to the runners from the Melbourne estate and she had been murdered. Adam is asking Rosalind’s help with the murder and she still needs to This is the 3rd installment of the Rosalind Thorne Mystery Series. Rosalind must take up residence in Lady Melbourne’s house and serve as her private secretary to recover some damaging letters that have been stolen from the estate. All is not what it seems as Adam Harkness a Bow street runner has informed Rosalind that the body of a young woman was delivered to the runners from the Melbourne estate and she had been murdered. Adam is asking Rosalind’s help with the murder and she still needs to recover the letters. Interesting regency period mystery which weaves in true historical figures (Lord Bryon and Lady Caroline Lamb). This is truly an engaging and enjoyable historical mystery. I have not read the first two in this series, however, I plan to so I can be ready for the next in the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    The third installment of the the Rosalind Thorne Mysteries finds her and Mr. Harkness needing to collaborate. Miss Thorne is invited to stay at Melbourne House to help discover what happened to a packet of letters that were penned by the Lord Byron. Letters that could be damaging to a number of people. At the same time that Miss Thorne receives this invitation, Mr. Harkness has discovered that a woman was murdered at Melbourne House. To help discover who this woman is and why she was murdered, The third installment of the the Rosalind Thorne Mysteries finds her and Mr. Harkness needing to collaborate. Miss Thorne is invited to stay at Melbourne House to help discover what happened to a packet of letters that were penned by the Lord Byron. Letters that could be damaging to a number of people. At the same time that Miss Thorne receives this invitation, Mr. Harkness has discovered that a woman was murdered at Melbourne House. To help discover who this woman is and why she was murdered, Mr. Harkness needs someone on the inside. And Dangerous to Know is full of intrigue and suspense. It is well written and a page turner. I have to admit that I was kept guessing until near the end, although the clues were there. Ms. Wilde is a fun author to read and her mysteries are a nice escape.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    The third installment of the the Rosalind Thorne Mysteries finds her and Mr. Harkness needing to collaborate. Miss Thorne is invited to stay at Melbourne House to help discover what happened to a packet of letters that were penned by the Lord Byron. Letters that could be damaging to a number of people. At the same time that Miss Thorne receives this invitation, Mr. Harkness has discovered that a woman was murdered at Melbourne House. To help discover who this woman is and why she was murdered, The third installment of the the Rosalind Thorne Mysteries finds her and Mr. Harkness needing to collaborate. Miss Thorne is invited to stay at Melbourne House to help discover what happened to a packet of letters that were penned by the Lord Byron. Letters that could be damaging to a number of people. At the same time that Miss Thorne receives this invitation, Mr. Harkness has discovered that a woman was murdered at Melbourne House. To help discover who this woman is and why she was murdered, Mr. Harkness needs someone on the inside. And Dangerous to Know is full of intrigue and suspense. It is well written and a page turner. I have to admit that I was kept guessing until near the end, although the clues were there. Ms. Wilde is a fun author to read and her mysteries are a nice escape.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    The plot for this one was really interesting, and I liked how carefully everything had to be done because of the powerful people involved. However, I think the best part of the whole thing is that the author is finally getting to the point where we are choosing whether the main love interest is Harkness or Devon. I don't mind a well written love triangle, but this one is going on for a bit too long. I loved the conversation she had with George Littlefield about it. He got to turn the tables on The plot for this one was really interesting, and I liked how carefully everything had to be done because of the powerful people involved. However, I think the best part of the whole thing is that the author is finally getting to the point where we are choosing whether the main love interest is Harkness or Devon. I don't mind a well written love triangle, but this one is going on for a bit too long. I loved the conversation she had with George Littlefield about it. He got to turn the tables on her and made her realize what she had been doing. I'm glad this plot thread will be getting resolved soon. Hopefully the next book is just as good as this one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen Fan

    I greatly enjoyed the book! I went in thinking this was a historical cozy and it shouldn’t be too difficult for me to catch up, but I was pleasantly surprised to find that this was a lovely historical mystery series. I was really only bothered by 2 things; why couldn’t she have woven in a bit more about her father, her mother, and her sister? She made a few remarks, but coming into the series a few books in, I really couldn’t follow along. And I strongly dislike romantic triangles; I understand I greatly enjoyed the book! I went in thinking this was a historical cozy and it shouldn’t be too difficult for me to catch up, but I was pleasantly surprised to find that this was a lovely historical mystery series. I was really only bothered by 2 things; why couldn’t she have woven in a bit more about her father, her mother, and her sister? She made a few remarks, but coming into the series a few books in, I really couldn’t follow along. And I strongly dislike romantic triangles; I understand why she’s torn, but I do hope they wrap this up quickly as we all know who she’ll pick.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne. I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW. Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging. Ms. Wilde has written an Although this is book three in a series, it is my first encounter with the protagonist, Rosalind Thorne. I loved everything about her, and about AND DANGEROUS TO KNOW. Years and years ago I was an avid reader of Georgette Heyer's Regency Romances---this book had that familiar element of the restricted society, the haughty grand dames, and the bright, aspiring heroine. But, in addition to the romance, we also have a mystery which I found engaging and challenging. Ms. Wilde has written an entertaining and engaging book and I enjoyed every minute I spent with it.

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